Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Olympic Weightlifting

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-16-2011, 06:59 AM   #1
Darryl Shaw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 708
Default Comparison of Kinetic Variables and Muscle Activity During a Squat vs. a Box Squat.

Quote:
Comparison of Kinetic Variables and Muscle Activity During a Squat vs. a Box Squat.

Abstract


McBride, JM, Skinner, JW, Schafer, PC, Haines, TL, and Kirby, TJ. Comparison of kinetic variables and muscle activity during a squat vs. a box squat. J Strength Cond Res 24(12): 3195-3199, 2010-

The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there was a difference in kinetic variables and muscle activity when comparing a squat to a box squat. A box squat removes the stretch-shortening cycle component from the squat, and thus, the possible influence of the box squat on concentric phase performance is of interest. Eight resistance trained men (Height: 179.61 ± 13.43 cm; Body Mass: 107.65 ± 29.79 kg; Age: 24.77 ± 3.22 years; 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 200.11 ± 58.91 kg) performed 1 repetition of squats and box squats using 60, 70, and 80% of their 1RM in a randomized fashion. Subjects completed the movement while standing on a force plate and with 2 linear position transducers attached to the bar. Force and velocity were used to calculate power. Peak force and peak power were determined from the force-time and power-time curves during the concentric phase of the lift. Muscle activity (electromyography) was recorded from the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, and longissimus. Results indicate that peak force and peak power are similar between the squat and box squat. However, during the 70% of 1RM trials, the squat resulted in a significantly lower peak force in comparison to the box squat (squat = 3,269 ± 573 N, box squat = 3,364 ± 575 N). In addition, during the 80% of 1RM trials, the squat resulted in significantly lower peak power in comparison to the box squat (squat = 2,050 ± 486 W, box squat = 2,197 ± 544 W). Muscle activity was generally higher during the squat in comparison to the box squat. In conclusion, minimal differences were observed in kinetic variables and muscle activity between the squat and box squat. Removing the stretch-shortening cycle during the squat (using a box) appears to have limited negative consequences on performance.
http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Fu..._Muscle.1.aspx
Darryl Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 08:20 AM   #2
Matt Thomas
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 61
Default

Very interesting.

"Removing the stretch-shortening cycle during the squat (using a box) appears to have limited negative consequences on performance."

Do you think this could also read "removing the stretch shortening cycle appears to have limited added benefit?"
Matt Thomas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 08:10 PM   #3
Blair Lowe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 591
Default

Well, the stretch-shorten cycle merely lets you lift a weight or force a bit more than you could do without. Effectively, it's a little trick to help out.

With many movements, it just becomes way more involved to take it or set it up. For instance like concentric squats.
Blair Lowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2011, 04:58 AM   #4
Spencer Mackay
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 43
Default

In the interests of athletic development, you could probably do mainly box squats if you continued to incorporate plyometric work into your program to make use of the SSC.

However, I'm a traditionalist and I think there are other benefits of full squats.
Spencer Mackay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2011, 01:27 PM   #5
Greg Everett
Administrator
 
Greg Everett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,721
Default

"However, during the 70% of 1RM trials, the squat resulted in a significantly lower peak force in comparison to the box squat (squat = 3,269 ± 573 N, box squat = 3,364 ± 575 N). In addition, during the 80% of 1RM trials, the squat resulted in significantly lower peak power in comparison to the box squat (squat = 2,050 ± 486 W, box squat = 2,197 ± 544 W). Muscle activity was generally higher during the squat in comparison to the box squat."

This is the part that's interesting to me. I think it's pretty simply explained - the momentum from the SSC is able to carry the lifter through the ROM faster and with less concentric muscular force. Although the last sentence above is confusing - presumably in the complete study they define what all they considered "muscle activity" since it must be more than peak force.

I would be more interested in seeing a similar study comparing a full-depth Olympic style pause/stop squat vs. a box squat. I think you would see the higher peak forces that they found in the box squat, but an even higher total "muscle activity" than the squat with SSC.
__________________
Olympic Weightlifting: A Complete Guide for Athletes & Coaches

"Without a doubt the best book on the market about Olympic-style weightlifting." - Mike Burgener, USAW Senior International Coach

American Weightlifting: The Documentary
Catalyst Athletics
Performance Menu Journal
Greg Everett is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:25 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator