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Old 10-17-2006, 12:19 PM   #1
Nicki Violetti
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Default Kyphosis and Handstands?

Does anyone have any experience working handstands with someone with fairly pronounced kyphosis?
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Old 10-20-2006, 10:57 AM   #2
Greg Everett
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What are you getting at here? Limitations? Contraindications? Help for correcting kyphosis? A kyphosis support group?
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Old 10-22-2006, 03:19 PM   #3
Robb Wolf
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Imagine the posture at that meeting...
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Old 10-22-2006, 03:48 PM   #4
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I imagine it would be rather, well, kyphotic.
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Old 11-14-2006, 03:39 PM   #5
Nicki Violetti
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Specifically I'm wondering is if it's reasonable for someone with kyphosis to ever be able to do a full depth handstand push-up. I've got a client who has this as a goal, but getting him in a handstand against the wall is a bit dicey. Tight shoulders in addition to the kyphosis produce a very poorly stabilized handstand. We are working on his shoulder flexibility, but I am wondering if the kyphosis will ultimately prevent his attaining full shoulder ROM, and therefore a good stable handstand and hspu. Thoughts?
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Old 01-02-2007, 12:42 PM   #6
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Nicki,
I know this post is really old, but it's been bothering me that noone ever responded to it.

I don't know that much, but I know the human body can do some amazing things. Keep it as a goal and keep the client working towards it, anything is possible. Like surviving 20 guns shots. Or the fact that I have any use of my left hand after a childhood accident. Who knows? I think why not in the abscence of any contrary evidence.

(no I haven't been shot 20 times but I know someone who has)
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