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Old 04-21-2007, 07:55 AM   #31
Yael Grauer
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Nice Jamila! I did this on the elliptical for a while too when I went to a gym that had no track. I tried to do it on the treadmill but I am uncoordinated and couldn't go from sprinting to putting my feet on the side without falling over.

What I did when I got better at it was made the intervals longer... 30 seconds of balls to the wall sprinting with 90 seconds of rest.
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Old 04-21-2007, 08:02 AM   #32
Chris Forbis
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When I'm in shape, one of my favorite track workouts is 10 100m sprints, each one on the minute. Works out really close to 15/45. When it's cold out, I'll stay on the basketball court and do 1/2 court back, full court back on each one (about the same total time as the 100m). Not as much emphasis on reaching and maintaining top speed, but accelerating out of those direction reversals is hard.

I'm not in shape right now, so I'm going to have to work my way up to doing 10 100m sprints starting every other minute. Once I can do that, I'll whittle the rest interval down.
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Old 04-22-2007, 04:54 PM   #33
Robb Wolf
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Chris-
Are you still competing in Track meets? You sent me a link to the geezer meets...I need to track that down again.
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Old 04-22-2007, 07:17 PM   #34
Chris Forbis
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You must be thinking of someone else... unless there is a Chris Forbis imposter out there.
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Old 04-23-2007, 03:21 PM   #35
David Wood
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Forbis View Post
When I'm in shape, one of my favorite track workouts is 10 100m sprints, each one on the minute. Works out really close to 15/45. When it's cold out, I'll stay on the basketball court and do 1/2 court back, full court back on each one (about the same total time as the 100m). Not as much emphasis on reaching and maintaining top speed, but accelerating out of those direction reversals is hard.

I'm not in shape right now, so I'm going to have to work my way up to doing 10 100m sprints starting every other minute. Once I can do that, I'll whittle the rest interval down.

Hmm. This is interesting. Did the 15/45 thing today (for 20 minutes) on the elliptical. Elevation cranked to about 18 (pretty steep, almost a stairstepper). Turnover during the 15 "on" was about 180 (maybe 190 occasionally); about 120 during the 45 "off". I cranked the resistance up for the "on" periods (that's electronic, changes more or less instantly) and back down for the "off'. Didn't change elevation.

Heart rate went way up (168 (that's high for me, I'm an old man)) during the "on" and wasn't coming down much during the "off" (maybe to 155, at best). But . . . I never felt out of breath . . . didn't seem like I was actually hurting for air. Felt like it wasn't long enough to induce actual oxygen debt. I'm wondering what the conditioning impact is if I'm not breathing all that hard.

This is in contrast to the basketball version of what Chris describes above . . . except I usually do them as:

-- 1/4 and back (free throw line), 1/2 court and back, 3/4, full court
-- do a "sprawl" at every change of direction (face down at one end, on my back at the other)
-- do that twice for one bout; whole thing takes about 3 (?) minutes


These leave me absolutely sucking air and feeling like I'm gonna die.

If I do 3 of these "bouts" (2 minutes rest) it's a hell of workout. The third one will usually take 4 minutes and is a major test of will.
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Old 04-23-2007, 05:18 PM   #36
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You must be thinking of someone else... unless there is a Chris Forbis imposter out there.
Damn...I picked the wrong day to quit sniffing glue!
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Old 04-23-2007, 07:27 PM   #37
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There are specific situations where complete recovery is recommended over incomplete recovery.

I think if you are interested in creating the most metabolic disturbance, for the purpose of conditioning or fat loss, then you have to limit recovery times, and also if the sports you compete at require you to get some then get some more with limited rest (most field sports)

AFTERBURN! TURBULANCE! GET SOME, GO AGAIN!

Complete recovery: Strength and power work...we've talked about the power bias before and also lactic acid and fiber type expression.
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Old 04-23-2007, 07:50 PM   #38
Mike Moore
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Hmm. This is interesting. Did the 15/45 thing today (for 20 minutes) on the elliptical. Elevation cranked to about 18 (pretty steep, almost a stairstepper). Turnover during the 15 "on" was about 180 (maybe 190 occasionally); about 120 during the 45 "off". I cranked the resistance up for the "on" periods (that's electronic, changes more or less instantly) and back down for the "off'. Didn't change elevation.

Heart rate went way up (168 (that's high for me, I'm an old man)) during the "on" and wasn't coming down much during the "off" (maybe to 155, at best). But . . . I never felt out of breath . . . didn't seem like I was actually hurting for air. Felt like it wasn't long enough to induce actual oxygen debt. I'm wondering what the conditioning impact is if I'm not breathing all that hard.

This is in contrast to the basketball version of what Chris describes above . . . except I usually do them as:

-- 1/4 and back (free throw line), 1/2 court and back, 3/4, full court
-- do a "sprawl" at every change of direction (face down at one end, on my back at the other)
-- do that twice for one bout; whole thing takes about 3 (?) minutes


These leave me absolutely sucking air and feeling like I'm gonna die.

If I do 3 of these "bouts" (2 minutes rest) it's a hell of workout. The third one will usually take 4 minutes and is a major test of will.
David - On the ultra short intervals it's important that when each work interval starts you ramp up to max level asap. When I do these on treadmill, I never change the speed. I leave it on the max speed for me and jump on and off (a little tricky at first depending on your setup). You may also need to decrease your rest time (I would suggest using 30 sec rest if your work time is 15 seconds and then adjust from there), but for these particular types of intervals don't use a work time greater than 15 seconds. Let me know how it works. The advantage of this type of interval is chiefly for those you don't want form to deteriorate due to local fatigue. Since there are local factors that should be trained (depending on your goals), but are not taxed using this method, I would also employ other types of interval training as well.

If you have never used complexes for either fat loss or conditioning, thses are an excellent choice as well (but only for those who enjoy a bit of suffering!).
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Old 04-23-2007, 08:21 PM   #39
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Mike: I agree that the elliptical doesn't allow a really quick transition back to max effort. In fact, I really worked these as 20/40 (not 15/45 as described) partly to account for the fact that the first 5 seconds are "ramping up".

Not sure I'm coordinated enough to do the treadmill thing if it's moving fast. My gym has good treadmills, nice broad platforms on either side, but I don't think I could jump on at high speed (multiple times) without eventually doing face plant. I could just do the fieldwork (as Chris suggests), or laps around the gym (that would be about 15 seconds).

I've done CF for years, so I've done some complexes (at least in that style). Not doing much of that right now due to an f'd-up shoulder (surgery in about 3 weeks); almost any form of work with the shoulder (including pushups, pullups, presses, or cleans) causes pain right now.

I can pretty much only do GHD stuff and leg work (Tabata FS with 65 pounds, for 3 sets, anyone?) By this time next year, I hope to be blasting away again.
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Old 04-24-2007, 10:14 AM   #40
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The protocol that has worked best for me, comfort and performance wise, has been the 30 sec. on/1 min. off. I can do this on a bike or elliptical or even a treadmill (although I hate the ramp up). My favorite is doing this whilst running stadiums. You get waaay more bang for your buck running up 30 rows in a stadium, especially when your kids are making fun of you and asking what's taking you so long.

I can't bring myself to do that on a C2. Hurts the back.

I also like the Shugart strategy for HIIT: run the straits, walk the curves. Do that for 20 min and your life takes on a new meaning.
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