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Old 05-11-2007, 12:40 PM   #11
Derek Simonds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Ross Hunt View Post
"The search for perfection continues although acceptable standards have already been met."

If that's insanity, check me in to the mental ward, Doc, stat!


I can see it now:

'Doctor, my son has a problem. He met this world-class weightlifter on a trip last year, and ever since then, he hasn't stopped training. He's broken all the USA records for his weight class and age, but when I tell him that he should stop training and just take it easy, he looks at me like I'm crazy and starts babbling about Greeks and Chinese. He won't have a second helping of dessert anymore. He's getting so muscular that his morbidly obese brother is starting to feel really self-conscious. I was trying to let it go, but last week he got suspended when he tried to get his P.E. teacher to let him go lift weights when the P.E. class assignment was XBox Live. I'm at the end of my rope. Please help me. I just want my little baby to like normal again!!!'

'It's all right, Ma'am. Just give him this experimental prescription sedative that's only been tested on chimpanzees. He'll be obese and playing his Xbox with his little brother like nothing happened... just call me if he starts experiencing sudden seizures or cancer, and everything'll be fine, kay?'
God if that isn't the truth. I absolutely despise the whole medicate the child to control behavior industry we have now.

I have a 7 year old son and a 5 year old daughter who both are interested in weightlifting. This morning I was doing OHS with a jo in the kitchen while they were eating. My son finishes breakfast and says I want to do what in you do with the weights. I say ok and give him the jo and he sets up and does a snatch. It was pretty classic.
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Old 05-11-2007, 02:40 PM   #12
Elliot Royce
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I would say that a related aspect is setting expectations too high. As Mike has pointed out to me several times, trying to do 4 sports (boxing, O lifting, CF, and hockey) each week at age 45 may be excessive. I may not be overtraining but I'm not accomplishing my objectives. I dropped the boxing and CF and focused on hockey and O lifting.

My injury rate has declined and I am making very good progress on the O lifts (see my log for evidence).

I do feel guilty when I don't lift but some sense of guilt is not bad. It's a motivator to get to the gym and I get over it.

Unless you have a body image problem and as long as your overall health is improving, then I'm not sure I see a big problem with being "addicted" to exercise. Of course it sells magazines to tell people that exercising too much (implication exercising at all) is unhealthy for you!
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Old 05-14-2007, 05:15 PM   #13
Yael Grauer
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Unless you have a body image problem and as long as your overall health is improving, then I'm not sure I see a big problem with being "addicted" to exercise.
I think a large majority of women have body image problems.

And a lot of men too though they are less likely to admit it.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1632112.stm
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Old 05-14-2007, 05:27 PM   #14
Mike ODonnell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliot Royce View Post
I would say that a related aspect is setting expectations too high. As Mike has pointed out to me several times, trying to do 4 sports (boxing, O lifting, CF, and hockey) each week at age 45 may be excessive. I may not be overtraining but I'm not accomplishing my objectives. I dropped the boxing and CF and focused on hockey and O lifting.
It's going to more gratifying to really master a couple of activities......rather than be average at them all.....

I've cut more "sport" type activities out of my life and only focus on those I really enjoy....not just stuff to keep "active"...as now I spend more time pursuing other things such as reading more....doing "nothing" more often....enjoying nature....etc....much more rewarding life now that I can slow it down and really appreciate everything that I let into my life....it's about the journey for me now....I gave up the whole living at the gym because I was obsessed about how I looked...and I never looked good enough....that's common with anyone who's main reason for working out is based upon physical appearance....I go for health now and the look just comes with it....
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Old 05-15-2007, 08:13 AM   #15
Robb Wolf
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Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
It's going to more gratifying to really master a couple of activities......rather than be average at them all.....

I've cut more "sport" type activities out of my life and only focus on those I really enjoy....not just stuff to keep "active"...as now I spend more time pursuing other things such as reading more....doing "nothing" more often....enjoying nature....etc....much more rewarding life now that I can slow it down and really appreciate everything that I let into my life....it's about the journey for me now....I gave up the whole living at the gym because I was obsessed about how I looked...and I never looked good enough....that's common with anyone who's main reason for working out is based upon physical appearance....I go for health now and the look just comes with it....
That's a tough process IMO...learning to do things for the joy of it and not out of an ego-driven need. That very word "driven"...it carries such favorable connotations but think about it. it conjures up an image of some whipped animal being driven forward!

But then the question arises: What about excellence? How does one pursue excellence for the sake of the process...being fully engaged and not for some external on again, off again validation?
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Old 05-15-2007, 10:11 AM   #16
Steve Shafley
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Funny. I used to be really devoted to my training. Now I'm not all that devoted to it, though I am swinging back another way.

Example: I don't train on vacation. I will hike, bike, kayak, swim, bodysurf, raft, etc, but I will not work out. I don't even know if I'd train if there was a fully equipped gym next door, but that would make it more likely.
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Old 05-15-2007, 10:38 AM   #17
Mike ODonnell
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I find activites more enjoyable (and perform better too) when I am not worried about performance, scores, times, what if I can't do it, etc....all that wasted energy. Even the top athletes will talk about being in the zone...just doing....and will say they have top performances.....I know scores and competitions motivate people...but if you are not worrying about the outcome and trying your best anyways...you should excell...much like doing something alone...and then in front of 10000 people....which will you do better? The physical act of performing is not different...just your perception and everything else that is now affecting you....
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Old 05-15-2007, 02:02 PM   #18
Russell Greene
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I am definitely exercise dependent, and you know what, I don't give a damn. If I'd rather workout than go party with friends or study a few extra hours, does that make me mentally unhealthy? If working out is fulfilling to me and I feel good when I do it and worse when I don't, am I excessively motivated? The interesting thing is that with Crossfit my exercise dependency, which seems to be considered anti-social behavior, has actually led to two of the best friendships I have.

I am annoyed by stuff which says, 80-90% of the population is X, therefore if you are not X then there is something wrong with you and you should seek counseling or purchase pharmaceuticals. Why should normal be considered optimal?
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Old 05-15-2007, 02:37 PM   #19
Derek Simonds
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I have lived my entire life as a jack of all trades master of none. I am involved in many different endeavors in work, exercise and hobbies. I am better than average at a majority of them. I understand what MOD is saying but the difference is to me if a given activity doesn't give me something back than I don't do it.

Today I lift, train for an olympic triathlon in sept, bjj, wakeboard, waterski, mountain bike and many other sports. All of them except bjj my family participates with me, even the triathlon training. I have played golf socially and for work but it doesn't appeal to me at all. I lose focus after 6 holes and than I wonder why I am wasting my time on the course. I am in a golf outing at the end of May for my company and I already am thinking about it.

Quote:
I know scores and competitions motivate people...but if you are not worrying about the outcome and trying your best anyways...you should excell...much like doing something alone...and then in front of 10000 people....which will you do better?
I think what you are talking about is passion. If you are passionate about something you will excel in private and in public. Performing in public changes everything. I will never forget the first time I put on a pair of Tri Trunks getting ready for a race. Holy Crap there is nothing to hide behind there. It gave me great motivation to be ready to put those on and walk amongst the crowd.
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Old 05-15-2007, 05:55 PM   #20
Garrett Smith
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Shaf,
I'm with you. I used to think I'd work out on vacation, I never seem to bring myself to (except when I was on a cruise ship with all the land whales and just had to do SOMETHING to get the blood flowing).

My wife and I have decided to strive for "active" vacations, where the activities planned involve some sort, however small, of physical exertion. I always feel like so much more has been accomplished/achieved if I contribute some level of energy to it...
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