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Shut Up, Flexibility
Greg Everett  |  General Training  |  June 12 2013

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Shut Up, Flexibility, Greg Everett,
A couple weeks ago, I sent out a newsletter in which I talked about the secret to flexibility being no secret at all, but simply commitment over time to work and consistency. In other words, there are no magic tricks or secret formulas or fancy gadgets that will suddenly increase your flexibility without any work. I think a lot of people waste inordinate amounts of time reading, watching videos, planning programs in their heads, and doing everything other than actually stretching, and find themselves, unsurprisingly, just as inflexible as they’ve always been month after month and year after year.

One of the readers of my newsletter pointed out that it’s much easier to maintain flexibility than develop it, and that the real secret was maintaining the natural flexibility of childhood into adulthood. Of course this is true, but it’s not very helpful to adults who didn’t have the foresight as 5-year-olds to stick with regular stretching for the next few decades.

Another pointed out that an athlete should have an appropriate degree of flexibility for his or her chosen sport, no more and no less. This is also true, and something I’ve been writing about since at least 2005 in this article; it’s also discussed in great detail in my book, Olympic Weightlifting: A Complete Guide for Athletes & Coaches. My point is that I’m not overlooking this part of flexibility; I’m just not talking about it right now. I’m talking about getting more flexible and assuming that one is doing so appropriately.

I can recall several years ago reading an article that claimed it was impossible for adults to increase flexibility. This is memorable to me because it was such an absurd notion; I see adults in my gym every day getting more flexible when they put in the work. I think this conclusion is the product of inflexible people getting frustrated and discouraged because they don’t see stunning, dramatic changes in flexibility after a couple days of stretching or knotting themselves up with elastic bands.

As an adult myself (at least biologically), and having slacked on my own formerly great flexibility for the last few years, I decided to run a little n=1 experiment on myself to see how long it would take, and what it would take, to get myself back to being able to do the front splits, something I was last able to do about seven or eight years ago.

The trick, though, was that I didn’t want to have to invest much time or effort into it. I have plenty of other things to keep myself busy. I wanted to test the idea of frequency and consistency being enough with nothing but simple, common stretches and not a lot of time or brain power. I didn’t want to use bands, PNF tricks, or anything but basic, static stretches that can be done by anyone.

Here is what I did:

Start Date: May 20 2013
End Date: June 8 2013
Foam Roll Frequency: 1 time/day, 5-6 days/week
Foam Roll Duration: approximately 10 passes
Stretch Frequency: 1-2 times/day, 5-7 days/week
Stretch Duration: 30-60 seconds

Foam Roll Series:
1. Upper back
2. Lateral glutes
3. Hamstrings
4. Quads (lateral to anterior)
5. VMOs/Adductors

Stretch Series:
1. Lying hamstring (straight knee)
2. Lunge
3. Butterfly
4. Straddle
5. Modified Pigeon Pose
6. Modified Hurdler’s Stretch
7. Front Split

That’s it. During this time period, I would break from working around 11, spend a little time doing this flexibility work, some ab work and some shoulder pre-hab work. After I trained in the afternoon/evening, sometimes I would stretch again depending on how much time and energy I had; this was maybe every other day.

Last Saturday after I trained, I did my stretching series and when I got to the front split, I was there again. Was it a perfect split position? Not really, but good enough for my purposes--my front hamstrings were pressed flat against the mat. That’s about three weeks of not much work and effort. Now, I’ll be fair and concede that I have historically been more flexible than the average person, and I did have this level of flexibility previously. I have no doubt that allows me to get this kind of improvement more quickly and easily than someone who has never been very flexible, but I also feel that letting that flexibility go for almost 10 years was a pretty good reset.

The point is that while you may not respond quite as quickly as I did, you will respond, and if you’re not getting more flexible, you’re doing something wrong—and I’d be willing to bet that’s not being consistent enough for long enough. Knuckle down and put in the work and time.
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Greg Everett is the owner of Catalyst Athletics, head coach of the national-medalist Catalyst Athletics weightlifting team, publisher of The Performance Menu, author of the books Olympic Weightlifting: A Complete Guide for Athletes & Coaches and Olympic Weightlifting for Sports, and director/writer/producer/editor/everything of the documentary American Weightlifting. Follow him on Facebook here and and sign up for his free newsletter here.
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Books, weightlifting, fitness, nutrition, strength, conditioning

Bones of Iron: Collected Articles on the Life of the Strength Athlete
Bones of Iron: Collected Articles on the Life of the Strength Athlete
The Coach's Strength Training Playbook
The Coach's Strength Training Playbook
Olympic Weightlifting: Cues & Corrections
Olympic Weightlifting: Cues & Corrections
Cooking for Health & Performance Volume 2 [E-Book]
Cooking for Health & Performance Volume 2 [E-Book]

11 Comments
Josh 1 | 2013-06-12
If only all of this were true for ankle flexibility :' (
Andrew 2 | 2013-06-12
ankle flexibility is a bitch. Especially when you had surgery on your ankle 5 years ago and never fully regained the mobility because you didn't notice you didn't have it until your knee started hurting from it. If I could wear WL shoes all day I would haha.
Jake 3 | 2013-06-21
Sprained both ankles badly the beginning of this year. They sure are slow to heal. Good article.
Ben 4 | 2013-07-21
Do some functional calf stretching. Hang out in the bottom of an air squat and shift your weight (controlled) from one side to the other while keeping your heels on the ground. As a soccer, volleyball, and basketball player Ive found this has been the best way to counter tightness and prevent injuries. Just my experience.
Mike 5 | 2013-08-27
Any chance of a video of how to do the routines you posted... just learning about stretching now and am one of those who wished I had the foresight as a 5 year old to have kept up stretching on a regular basis!
Joe 6 | 2013-11-26
As a sports therapist there is a big part to stretching that will help a lot. I have used it in my injuries to ankles as well. This would be myofascial work. Have someone work the skin for you in the lower leg. Fascia adhesion can inhibit flexibility greatly. I have 95% range of motion back from an injury with a prognosis of 50-60% ROM. It has taken me years but I am back at it with minimal pain.
Erica 7 | 2014-03-11
What about people who have NEVER been flexible? Even when I was a little girl in ballet class, all the other girls could do the splits and I couldn't... should I give up hope?
Steve Pan 8 | 2014-03-11
Erica - Things can't improve if you don't work on them. Keep working and you will get at least some benefit.
Greg Everett 9 | 2014-06-25
Joe- Agreed, which is why I recommended foam rolling before stretching - this is the practical alternative to having a manual therapist work on you 7 days/week.
Greg Everett 10 | 2014-06-25
Erica- Don't give up hope. Just like with anything, consistency and persistence will pay off eventually.
Bill 11 | 2014-07-06
What do the "modified" stretches look like?
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