Exercise Library

Jerk Support



The jerk support is a simple overhead strength exercise for the jerk.
 
 
Execution
 
Set up a barbell in a power rack at a height 2-3 inches below where it would be if overhead in a standing position with a jerk grip. Set your jerk grip on the bar and lower yourself into a partial squat under the bar with locked elbows. Make sure you’re balanced directly under the bar—some lifters like to hang off the bar to get centered and then place their feet on the floor. With the trunk and upper back locked tightly, push with the legs straight up to lift the bar off the pins and hold steady for the prescribed time—usually 3-5 seconds. Lower the bar back onto the rack by bending at the knees.
 
 
Notes
 
The most difficult part of the exercise is usually the initial break of the bar off the rack and ensuring it’s balanced. Make sure you’re locking in the upper back and trunk tightly and squeeze the bar up off the pins rather than trying to lift it abruptly.
 
 
Purpose
 
The jerk recovery is a way to strengthen the overhead position for the jerk that allows the use of weights beyond what the lifter can jerk, or at least can or should jerk at that time. It can also help with confidence in the jerk.  
 
 
Programming
 
The jerk recovery should generally be placed at or near the end of a workout. Single lifts or 2-3 repetitions are most common. Weights can range anywhere from 90% to over 100% of the lifter’s best jerk. Often a lifter can just work up to the heaviest possible on a given day.  
 
 
Variations
 
The main variation of the jerk support is another exercise called the jerk recovery.   
 
 
See Also
 





2 Comments
 

Chris 2016-05-30
Hello I wanted to incorporate more jerk support and recoveries in my routine. However I am worried about damage the knurling on my olympic barbell. Any tips? Controlled decent back to the pins? I own an eleiko training barbell and use a rogue squat rack. Thanks.
Hi Chirs,

If you don't have the option to use another bar for the supports and recoveries, then you'll just have to make sure that you aren't sliding and twisting the bar around on the pins. Another option would be make  protective sleeves for the pins. We used some leftover rubber from the floor and that seemed to work great. Hope this helps!

Alyssa Sulay
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