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-   -   When do you do Static Holds? (http://www.catalystathletics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5846)

Aaron Griffin 11-04-2010 03:06 PM

When do you do Static Holds?
 
I'm somewhat following the BtGB protocol for static holds. Four of them: L-Sit, Back Lever, Front Lever, and Planche. I am still very new to these gymnastic movements and don't really have beyond 20s in any of the tuck positions (or straight-armed frog stand).

So, in order to improve these, how often should I train them? I workout in the morning, so timing is an issue for me. If I do all 4, at maybe 6x10s holds, with rest, it's going to take a bit to accomplish them all. I could maybe fit in 2 per day.

Is that adequate? How would you pair them? Any other ideas?

Troy Kerr 11-04-2010 05:36 PM

Aaron-

This is really going to be based on your goals and personal development. Currently I follow a similiar format: Tuck planche, one-leg front lever, one leg back lever, handstands ( either free standing progression or stomach to wall support), and l-sits. I currently do 3 days a week. So a MWF format. If you find that you can handle a Mon,tues, Thurs, Fri routine week to week I would go for it. I would also start incorporating handstand work ASAP. Also check out steven lows fundamental bodyweight training article on Eatmoveimprove.com. This should definitley help clear up some questions.

Steven Low 11-04-2010 08:14 PM

After warmup and skill work

I put reasoning why in here and other tidbits too:

http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2010/0...ength-training

3-4x a week all of them each session + extra push/pull stuff if you need.

Aaron Griffin 11-05-2010 08:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troy Kerr (Post 82674)
... handstands ( either free standing progression or stomach to wall support) ... I would also start incorporating handstand work ASAP.

I've been doing HeSPUs and wall handstands for sometime now. But I'd love to be able to do a free-standing handstand. Is there some "official" progression for this? I'm been working on wall handstands and free-standing headstands for time.

Aaron Griffin 11-05-2010 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steven Low (Post 82681)
After warmup and skill work

I put reasoning why in here and other tidbits too:

http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2010/0...ength-training

3-4x a week all of them each session + extra push/pull stuff if you need.

Thanks. I've read that article before, but I have to admit it's a lot to digest in one sitting. Is there anything wrong with only training one of the four per day, 6 days a week? I understand progression will be slower, but it would still work, yes? I'm willing to do two per day is necessary, but likely couldn't do more simply due to time.

As an aside, the linked article mentions handstand and manna paired work... I do not have access to parallel bars, but have parallettes at home. Any advice on learning this skill with the equipment I have?

Steven Low 11-05-2010 09:54 AM

2 per day 5-6 days a week may work.

Manna is a skill learned on the ground. you do not need parallel bars for this.

Handstands against the wall.... stomach to wall.... start trying to free balance them by pushing the toes off slightly.

Aaron Griffin 11-05-2010 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steven Low (Post 82699)
Handstands against the wall.... stomach to wall.... start trying to free balance them by pushing the toes off slightly.

I see this advice a lot, but it's a little scary in my apartment. Falling backwards is very different from falling forwards. :)

Troy Kerr 11-05-2010 10:54 AM

Aaron, I will give you some tips on how I progressed through handstands. For the last 4-5 months I trained handstands exclusively stomach to wall, 3-4 times a week. The big things I focused on was 1) keeping the weight centered on my palms. 2) keep my arms locked, and keeping my elbows turned inward. This is was simply rotating my elbows towards my ears while inverted. I find I am stronger in this position. I do this as well with the planche and find the carry-over to be tremendous. 3) Keeping my stomach hollowed out. 4) Keeping my glutes and legs locked, and toes pointing up.
I basically worked up 60 seconds each session. Now I follow a MWF routine. Day 1- I work HSPU, I do them off of homemade p-bars. I am working on progressing toward head-to-floor full ROM. Day 2- I do a stomach to wall holds. I bring my legs from straight up to straddle and back up 3 sets of 5. I use as little support from my big toe as possible. I find this has really helped as most sets I come off the wall for a freestanding handstand. Day 3- I do wall taps. So still static hold work, but just a different drill. I have yet to determine a time duration or sets and reps for it, coach sommer recommends his athletes build up to 10 minutes straight. I am probably thinking 5-6 sets of 10 reps.

I find this helps keep the routine fresh and still allows me to progress in strength. The other day I completed a 15 ft. freestanding handstand walk.

Hope this helps

Grissim Connery 11-05-2010 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aaron Griffin (Post 82704)
I see this advice a lot, but it's a little scary in my apartment. Falling backwards is very different from falling forwards. :)

you need to practice rolling out of a handstand. find an open area, practice forward rolls over your shoulders. once you feel cozy with that, practice going over your head. once your good there, kick up to handstand and slowly lower as you tuck your chin to your chest and roll out. practice this a lot until you get it to be smooth. your first couple times may be bumpy if you don't round your body enough when you roll out of HS.


as for HS training, the wall holds are all great. in addition, i think practicing presses to HS have helped me a lot. this is the progression i've been using (didn't really read it anywhere, just kinda started doing it).

1. toe bounce to press => get on all fours; bounce on the balls of your feet until you feel that you can bounce your hips up and press up

2. multiple rocking to press => get on all fours; rock back and forth, putting your weight on your feet and then your hands, over and over; once you can generate enough momentum, rock forward hard and ride it up to a press

3. single vicious rock => get on all fours; keep your weight planted on your feet while your hands are light but stable on the ground; viciously rock forward bringin your weight to your hands and ride the momentum up to a press

4. single slow rock => same as the last, but try to slow down the momentum more and more

5. brute press => lean over, put your hands on the ground, and push the earth as hard as you can; slower is harder


as for leg positioning, i've just done straddles, split legs, and pike work (from easiest to hardest). some people do tucks, but i don't find it to be as helpful for me.
- try doing straddle presses a lot, and as you get more control, try to add a brief pause when your legs come to parallel w/ the ground. this is the hardest part and i think helps develop the piked one.
- the split one is something i started recently after seeing it on luis sarabia's site (which is AWESOME if you haven't been there yet). you press/kick up to HS and have one leg point up while one points the same direction as your belly button. it helps you tighten up the glutes as well as the hamstrings and lower back
- pike is just hard. i think once you can do a single slow rock to HS while straddling, you can start trying the pike stuff more.

note: i work all this on a handbalancing platform that i made. i find that it makes some of the pressing harder than the floor, but the flexibility aspects are easier.

Aaron Griffin 11-05-2010 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grissim Connery (Post 82718)
you need to practice rolling out of a handstand. find an open area, practice forward rolls over your shoulders. once you feel cozy with that, practice going over your head. once your good there, kick up to handstand and slowly lower as you tuck your chin to your chest and roll out. practice this a lot until you get it to be smooth. your first couple times may be bumpy if you don't round your body enough when you roll out of HS.

Rolling is not a problem. I train japanese jujutsu in my free time, and there's lots of roll practice - including parkour style distance and height leaps/rolls. It's not the dismount I'm afraid of, it's the momentum. I have a small apartment, and if I were to roll out of a handstand, I imagine lots of stuff will get broken :)

I'm thinking of using a hallway so if I lose my balance, I can support myself on the opposing wall if I lose balance


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