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Old 12-11-2006, 09:45 PM   #8
Steve Shafley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,285
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Pierre, you've got to show me the money on this:

Quote:
A good coach shouldn't stand on competent athletes a good coach should produce competent athletes.
Because there's reasonable doubt in my mind. Everyone "comes" to Crossfit, there are very few "home-grown". I'd say that XF can't take credit for a Robb Wolf, a Josh Everett, a Mark Twight, though I would come back and say that XF has definitely added something to their mixes, but the basic recipe had already been cooked up.

And this:

Quote:
Athletes in contact sports particularly are no different than SF personel. They are required to enter particularly riscky scenerios yet we train to avoid risk, which causes us to systematically fail when risk crops up when its least expected. We are fooling ourselves if we think avoiding something that may, perhaps, possibly, maybe cause an injury and believing that we will be ready to handle physical stress.
I respectfully beg to differ.

Quote:
Athletes in contact sports particularly are no different than SF personel.
Let's get to the very lowest common denominator. If your operator is injured, he won't go out. If your athlete is injured. He can't play. In that way they are similar. SFs need to operate under the worst conditions imaginable. Athlete operate under the best conditions imaginable. This should impact their training. SFs' lives are at stake. Athletes' livelihoods are. An athlete in a contact sports needs are dictated by the sport. An SF doesn't need to be able to ice skate and shoot a puck, and an hockey player doesn't need to be a expert rifleman. Those are a fairly superficial example, but it serves to illustrate my point.

Quote:
They are required to enter particularly riscky scenerios yet we train to avoid risk, which causes us to systematically fail when risk crops up when its least expected.
This is completely unfounded. There is absolutely NOTHING linking training to avoid risk and "systematically" failing when risk crops up when "least expected." I understand you were a soldier. What happens to soldiers in combat when things are "least expected"? They die. What happens to athletes in a similar situation. They lose, or get injured, or, in extreme cases, they die. Neither the soldier or the athlete should be unprepared for those types of situations. This a product of training OTHER than that of physical conditioning.

Quote:
We are fooling ourselves if we think avoiding something that may, perhaps, possibly, maybe cause an injury and believing that we will be ready to handle physical stress.
Pierre...I'm not going to let you get away with anything here. This is just unfounded, pure and simple, like the entire paragraph. Maybe your first language isn't english, but your statements have a bizarre kind of circularity as in "what came first, the chicken or the egg?"

There is nothing inherent in avoiding a potential injurious situation or exercise that's implicit in failure somewhere further on down the line.

I don't want you to feel like I'm attacking you, Pierre. You often have excellent insights and opinions. This isn't one of them.
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