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Old 12-09-2008, 04:41 AM   #3
Garrett Smith
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum
Quote:
These findings highlight the importance of imposing restrictions on weightlifting prior to and during clinical studies. Intensive muscular exercise, e.g. weightlifting, should also be considered as a cause of asymptomatic elevations of liver function tests in daily clinical practice.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum
Quote:
An acute-phase inflammatory response consisted of a post-game peak of leukocyte count, cytokines, and cortisol, a 24-hour peak of CRP, TBARS, and DOMS, a 48-hour peak of CK, LDH, and PC, and a 72-hour peak of uric acid.[...]A single soccer game induces short-term muscle damage and marked but transient inflammatory responses. Anaerobic performance seems to deteriorate for as long as 72-hour post-game. The acute phase inflammatory response in soccer appears to follow the same pattern as in other forms of exercise. These results clearly indicate the need of sufficient recovery for elite soccer players after a game.
Put simply, you should get the tests redone. They are likely not valid for much at this point.
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