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Old 01-16-2009, 07:39 AM   #16
Darryl Shaw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 706
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Greg,

As you are studying dietetics perhaps you could answer a couple of questions:

1: Is it sensible for an athlete engaged in a strength training program to rely on gluconeogenesis for energy in order to make up for a low energy low carbohydrate diet given the proven and well documented protein sparing effects of carbohydrates?

2: If an athlete came to you complaining of fatigue and of having legs that feel "heavy and slow" and "lack explosiveness" would you -

a/ Address the well known problems associated with athletes consuming diets that are low in both energy and carbohydrates by advising them on how they could improve their performance through dietary changes eg. increasing their calorie and carbohydrate intake then if that failed to improve matters in 4 - 6 weeks order further tests.

or

b/ Ignore the well known problems associated with athletes consuming diets that are low in both energy and carbohydrates and prescribe vitamin supplements.
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