Thread: Butyric Acid
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Old 12-11-2009, 06:24 AM   #14
Darryl Shaw
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Join Date: Apr 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Romano View Post
Yeah, Darryl...I actually read it the same way, although I disagree that LDL levels are really a cause of heart disease. Robb mentioned acid/base balance as a reason to consume fruits/veggies, and I think butyrate gives these foods more utility than a lot of people give them credit for.

but I do have sources for ldl/heart disease....let me know what you think...

http://www.ahjonline.com/article/PII...07175/fulltext

summary....LDL levels in patients with CAD have decreased over the past 40 years....if you have "healthy levels of cholesterol" (LDL less than 100) you are more likely to end up in the hospital.
I'm a little short on time today so I've only had the chance to read the abstracts and skim through the rest of those studies but here goes anyway.........

Okay, unless I'm missing something that study suggests that current recommendations on healthy/safe LDL levels are a little high and maybe doctors should be looking for CVD in patients who are currently deemed to be at low risk of disease. Also doctors should be advising patients on ways to increase HDL levels, improve other lifestyle factors affecting disease risk etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Romano
and

http://atvb.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/24/3/498

low saturated fat diets with copious amounts of fruit/vegetables actually increased heart disease risk...something the authors attribute to the lack of saturated fat

Not saying a TON of fat is good...but there are certainly beneficial effects of having some saturated fat in the diet, even if it does raise LDL. Have a couple more studies for later, but I have to take a final now....
Having only skimmed through it I'd guess that the use of rapeseed and sunflower oils along with vegetable oil spreads instead of olive oil would explain the increased LDL oxidation over baseline levels. Regardless of that though it's clear that the high vegetable diet resulted in a lower rise in OxLDL than the low vegetable diet (19% vs 27% respectively). Conclusion - eat your veggies and you'll reduce your risk of CVD regardless of how crappy the rest of your diet is.
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