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Old 01-06-2010, 08:29 AM   #41
Tom Fetter
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9
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The games may easily lose money as an event, but they're a primary source of Journal content. And also, frankly, a primary source of Crossfit's product - which I do not think is a brand name, but a dream, an aspirational community.

The dream is that with enough focus on intense and varied training, enough grit, enough time spent on skill development, that anyone can be a firebreather. Mind trumps genetics. The Games represent a pinnacle, but an achievable pinnacle ... not one that depends on the eye-hand coordination to play major league baseball, the size and athleticism to play NFL or NBA. Crossfit's much-ballyhooed appeal to military and LEOs ties in as well; we all know that Games competitors may not be pro-athlete material, but we convince ourselves that as GPP specialists, they'd be modern Spartans.

And it's hard to dispute that Games competitors aren't so far removed from the fitness of the general population, even of the general population of mildly athletic folks, that the dream's got no connection to reality.

But the conceit is that everyone can become a firebreather. Oh, everyone can become a firebreather in comparison with their own untrained potential, to be sure, but we are not all latent Spartans.

But that's what CF sells; the dream of being a Spartan, and a methodology which manifestly seems to get people there. A methodology which works well enough with untrained populations to produce striking changes in short order - changes that are striking enough to convince CFers that if they themselves did have enough focus, grit, time, dedication etc., that they would be Spartans. And that not being that is a choice, more than a fact of genetics.
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