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Old 07-21-2010, 01:22 PM   #41
Donald Lee
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Join Date: Mar 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grissim Connery View Post
i was kinda wondering about something like this. you guys mentioned that the versa climber or bike are preferred b/c you can crank the resistance so that strength is maintained in the long run even after doing a lot of cardio and the upper body is taxed. why can't somebody just deadlift as their cardio if they maintained the heart rate and had a weight that limited them to like 4-10 reps per minute? after i would think that this would cause one to get really sore, but then wouldn't one get just as sore on a bike or something if the resistance was just as hard?
The versa climber of spin bike is only used for HICT (High Intensity Continuous Training), which is one of many methods in the book. The goal of HICT is to make both the slow and fast twitch fibers more oxidative. It works quite a large range of muscle fibers. You do this by doing continuous work at a high intensity that can be maintained.

The highest power output that can be maintained is usually at about your lactate threshold, which tends to be in the 170-180 HR beats/min for most folks. Threshold training is done at close to this power output/pace/HR (depends what you're using to measure). Threshold type training is more specific than HICT or general cardiac output work because it's bringing all the other adaptations together at a race pace. This is speaking more for someone training for an endurance event like running, but the principles still hold.

Like I stated in an earlier post, HICT is not about the heart:

http://performancemenu.com/forum/sho...6&postcount=23

HICT is done at about 10 beats/min below your lactate threshold. The relatively high heart rate indicates that you're working at a high intensity, which ensures that your higher threshold fibers are recruited. Also, as you perform at an intensity higher than your lactate threshold, you begin to exponentially rely on your lactic system more.

And, HICT isn't about speed. Speed elevates your heart rate moreso than resistance level. Higher speed can potentially skip the lower threshold fibers and recruit exclusively higher threshold fibers. I'm actually pretty sure this doesn't occur in anything requiring endurance, but the fact remains that the slow, grinding type of work done at about 10 beats/min below your lactate threshold is probably the most effective for making a large range of muscle fibers oxidative.

Quote:
you guys mentioned that the versa climber or bike are preferred b/c you can crank the resistance so that strength is maintained in the long run even after doing a lot of cardio and the upper body is taxed.
I'm not sure I get what you're saying here. The versa climber allows you to use HICT for both the upper body and lower body at the same time. I think Joel has tried out another machine as well, but I'm not sure if he recommends it. The spin bike, weighted step-ups, and uphill lunges are other options for HICT, but they only work the lower body.

Quote:
why can't somebody just deadlift as their cardio if they maintained the heart rate and had a weight that limited them to like 4-10 reps per minute? after i would think that this would cause one to get really sore, but then wouldn't one get just as sore on a bike or something if the resistance was just as hard?
4-10 reps/min is not continuous. HR is an imperfect indicator of power output. Even if you were able to maintain the desired HR, you're not getting the desired adaptation by only performing 4-10 reps/min. You could try to do deadlifts light enough to maintain for 5-10 min, but then you wouldn't be recruiting your higher threshold fibers. Your grip would also give out, even with straps. HICT only works with a few things.

If what I wrote sounds like jibberish, I'll try to clarify.

Grissim,

Do you understand the size principle and what making your muscles more oxidative means? If you don't understand those two things, what I wrote might not make much sense.
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