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Old 10-29-2010, 08:41 AM   #1
James Evans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: London
Posts: 594
Default Kettlebells and grip

Ok, I've always glazed over in the past when I've seen stuff about sanding KB handles so I'm going to be lazy and just ask for advice here...

I've owned and used KBs for over 4 years. Mine are handmade by a blacksmith and I love them. I have not had grip issues with them for a long time and they feel very fluid in movements like the snatch. I realise now this may be down to the gloss finish.

Recently a bought a load more from here to use with the rowers I coach. I have experience of these in the past and I was under the impression that they had identical dimensions to the those I already owned. What I have noticed while playing around with a little and the odd snatch demo to the guys is they don't seem as smooth to shift. I managed to yank myself a bit earlier in the week and then last night I was using a 20k in a finisher (20-15-5 reps each arm) and damn if I couldn't even manage 12 reps an arm on the first set my grip was absolutely fried and my forearms completely blown up. I can normally blitz this in a couple of minutes without dropping the bells.

Couple of things:

1. I can snatch and press a 24kg for reps easily, I've snatched up to 40k no problem

2. My grip may have been hammered last night prior to the snatches but I was still taken aback by how hard this was.

When I mulled this over on the way home I thought about the matt finish of the new bells and the relative roughness of the handles. They don't have the smoothness or the fluidity that I'm used to. Does anyone know where I'm coming from with this? I had always assumed sanding was mostly for hand care but how much does it impact on performance? I haven't measured the diameter of the handles so don't know for certain if they are the same as my old ones.

So, sand them or suck it up and strengthen my hands?
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