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Old 11-29-2010, 10:10 AM   #17
Jarod Barker
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 320
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Wilson View Post
My brother in law actually has the same issue, flat feet and was talking about the dr recommending orthotics. Definitely something more to look into.



Ya, definitely some mechanical things going on.
Harvard on barefoot running: http://www.barefootrunning.fas.harva...iningTips.html
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jrnj-7YKZE
SportSci: http://www.sportsci.org/jour/0103/mw.htm#_Toc535425249
Correcting foot pronation: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&p...key=CJ3fy_4 H
Biomechanical Factors Associated with Tibial
Stress Fracture in Female Runners: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&p...BQz zqp&hl=en
The harvard site has more excellant info through it.

Sounds the next thing to look into is are leg bones connecting in a straight line on impact (no leaning internally/extern)...Have you ever had any knee injuries?
No knee injuries thankfully. I've been lucky there, and no ankle injuries in at least the last 8 years save for my recent injury, but that was really because the metatarsal fractured and tore the ligament.

My pain, 99.9% of the time, is the back of tibias. And I think it might be the soleus that's causing problems because when I squat, the backs of my tibias hurt like hell. Even when I "dog" squat, you know up on the balls of your feet, my tibias are screaming in pain. Secondly, all the times that I've had MRIs on my tibias to look for stress fractures, they always note that there is edema at the insertion point of the soleus, but then they never diagnose that as anything more. Maybe Steven could shed some light on the MRI reading, but when I ask the ortho about the soleus, they always tell me "don't worry about it, muscles heal on their own."
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