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Old 11-09-2006, 09:38 AM   #3
Greg Everett
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I don't have links off hand, but what I can say is this:

1. Lots of individual variation in terms of how/how much LSD affects body comp, performance, etc. But typically the people who can maintain and/or build lean body mass well while doing high volume LSD are genetic anomolies and maintain good body comp regardless of training.

2. Consider adaptation--your body of course adapts to the stimuli to which it's exposed. LSD training is telling your body it needs to be able to fuel LSD efforts. The way to get better at this is functional conversion of type II muscle to type I (i.e. increasing mitochondrial density, increasing oxidative ezyme activity, reducing power capacity), eventually atrophy of type II muscle to reduce body mass and have less to carry and support metabolically (since type II despite some degree of conversion will never match type I's oxidation and fatigue-resistance capacities), and ultimately some atrophy of type I muscle to further reduce body mass and increase capillary density.

Go look at a track team--line up the sprinters next to the distance runners. Nearly invariably the sprinters are lean, muscular and powerful; the distance runners are skinny, have higher body fat %, and have little power capacity.

As far as excessive oxidative stress from LSD goes, there are arguments that claim the body can bump up its inherent anti-oxidant capacity, but nothing stunning. It's not argued by any sources I know of that LSD suppresses immune system function. Repetitive use injuries. Hypotension. Unnaturally regular heart beat.

I think Art DeVany has written quite a bit on the subject. Here's one link:
http://www.arthurdevany.com/archives...isk/index.html
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