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Old 02-15-2009, 05:53 PM   #1
Jeff Yan
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 88
Default persistent cough due to intense metcons

Not sure if this is the appropriate forum, but here goes:

After particularly intense metcons, I sometimes develop a cough, despite not being sick (or at least I'm not ill immediately going into the workout).

I've done a quick search on the CF boards and this is what I found:
Some of the conclusions that come up include:
  • low grade pneumonia
  • exercise induced pulmonary edema
  • exercise induced asthma
I'm not sure exactly what the distinctions here are. Any explanations?

Other personal observations:
  • I'm not positive, but it seems that my condition is made worse or more likely to come about/recur whenever the weather outside is cold.
  • My coughing persists for several days, not just for a few minutes or hours as noted by other sufferers in the above threads.

Some workouts that have prompted coughing fits that last for days:
  • 4 rounds: run 400m, 50 squats
  • Fight Gone Bad
  • Fran

Can anybody provide some more insight?

Thanks!
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Old 02-15-2009, 06:59 PM   #2
George Mounce
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When I hadn't played hockey for 6 months or done any real activity I had the same thing. It eventually went away. Has this always happened, or is it something new?
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Old 02-15-2009, 07:08 PM   #3
Kevin Perry
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Jeff if you check out my log something happened to me too when I did fran, it got bad that I could only due half the workout but I have a history of pulmonary problems. Steven gave a good rundown of what it could be.
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Old 02-15-2009, 08:43 PM   #4
Steven Low
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Exercise induced interstitial pulmonary edema = fluid buildup in lungs = coughing

Cold air = worse gas exchange = lack of O2/CO2 exchange = hyperventilation

Hyperventilation aggravates the coughing.

If you google interstitial pulmonary edema and "high intensity" you'll see some studies on high intensity exercise causing the edema.
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Old 02-15-2009, 10:09 PM   #5
Jeff Yan
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George
What level of competition/intensity was the hockey (like was it a league game or a casual pick up) and how long were your shifts?

-----

The first time I noticed the coughing bouts was after I did the 4 rounds of run 400m, 50 squats WOD while running outside in the winter.

This history of coughing after workouts doesn't go far back, but then again, I've only been doing CF for about 2 years. Not surprisingly though, nothing else I've done in my years of GPP exercising in fitness centers have come close to reaching the intensity that CF demands.

I've never had a hockey practice that was so hard that I ended up with a coughing fit.

When I used to swim on a team (practices are often pretty physically strenuous) I can only think of one instance specifically where I ended up with a cough that lasted for a day or two. That instance followed a Swim-a-Thon fundraiser consisting of 200 laps of a 25 yard pool (a bit less than 3 miles total), an event which takes roughly 1.5-2 hours to complete. During the middle of the Swim-a-Thon, the staff brought up the locker room floor tiles onto the pool deck to scrub them down with detergent.

I looked up "pulmonary edema" and read that inhalation of toxic gases is a cause.
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Old 02-16-2009, 07:44 AM   #6
Steven Low
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Quote:
I looked up "pulmonary edema" and read that inhalation of toxic gases is a cause.
Come on dude..... I said to look up...

interstitial pulmonary edema with high intensity

I strongly doubt you're being poisoned by toxic gas during your workouts.
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