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Old 03-23-2009, 02:03 PM   #1
Evan Levy
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Default Need Studies/journal Articles!

I am currently working at a facility that is all about high carb/high glycemic load diets to improve performance and health. I have been trying to find specific studies/journal articles that prove a low insulin and proper balance of macronutrient meal plan can improve performance and reduce the risk of disease. I have been zoning for 5 months and have seen benefits first hand, however, I want more studies to prove that there is an alternate route to a high carb/insulin diet. Any and all information would be helpful.
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Old 03-23-2009, 04:27 PM   #2
Mike ODonnell
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Is this a "sports performance" place by any chance?
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Old 03-24-2009, 07:19 AM   #3
Darryl Shaw
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The zone diet and athletic performance.

Cheuvront SN.

Department of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.

The Zone diet is the latest eating regimen marketed to improve athletic performance by opposing traditional high carbohydrate sports diets. The 40/30/30 diet is centred primarily on protein intake (1.8 to 2.2 g/kg fat free mass; i.e. total bodyweight-fat weight) and promises a change in the body's insulin to glucagon ratio through its macronutrient alterations. Changes in the existing hormonal milieu are said to result in the production of more vasoactive eicosanoids, thus allowing greater oxygen delivery to exercising muscle. This favourable condition, known as the Zone, is anecdotally reported to benefit even the most elite endurance athletes. Applying the Zone's suggested protein needs and macronutrient distributions in practice, it is clear that it is a low carbohydrate diet by both relative and absolute standards, as well as calorie deficient by any standard. Reliable and abundant peer reviewed literature is in opposition to the suggestion that such a diet can support competitive athletic endeavours, much less improve them. The notion that a 40/30/30 diet can alter the pancreatic hormone response in favour of glucagon is also unfounded. The Zone is a mixed diet and not likely to affect pancreatic hormone release in the same way individual nutrients can. Although the postprandial insulin response is reduced when comparing a 40% with a 60% carbohydrate diet, it is still a sufficient stimulus to offset the lipolytic effects of glucagon. Many of the promised benefits of the Zone are based on selective information regarding hormonal influences on eicosanoid biology. Contradictory information is conveniently left out. The principle of vasodilating muscle arterioles by altering eicosanoid production is notably correct in theory. However, what little human evidence is available does not support any significant contribution of eicosanoids to active muscle vasodilation. In fact, the key eicosanoid reportedly produced in the Zone and responsible for improved muscle oxygenation is not found in skeletal muscle. Based on the best available scientific evidence, the Zone diet should be considered more ergolytic than ergogenic to performance.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum

You can also find a review of the Zone Diet in Clinical Sports Nutrition (3rd edition) by Louise Burke and Vicki Deakin (p.146-8, 475-6) but they reach the same conclusion as above ie. the Zone Diet is to low in calories and carbohydrates to be of any use to athletes and will in all probability have a detrimental effect on performance.
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Old 03-24-2009, 07:31 AM   #4
Mike ODonnell
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I'm not a fan of the Zone...but I know you can adjust blocks or whatever they call them to get higher intake of calories. A zone at a standard level is VERY low in calories....but you can make the calories high and keep the ratios. But...I don't do zone and like my carbs pwo. ANY diet too low in calories is not ideal for athletic performance....even high carbohydrate low calorie.

I'd be more interested in a study comparing diet protocols of the SAME amount of calories and different ratios of macroutrient intake rather than you using every thread as an opportunity to dismiss everything but a high carb diet as ideal.
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:46 AM   #5
Liam Dougherty Springer
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MOD- I know Evan personally and what he needs more than anything is articles/study reviews that are peer reviewed which show benefits of diets conducive to the use of stored energy during exertion. Basically something to combat the idea that food fuels the function and more that food refuels depletion.

I along with many came into my current dietary plan of “eat what my body asks for when it asks for it” through a Paleo/Zone/IF approach and then playing around from there. But today I realize while the zone is a way to open my metabolism to a more proper hormonal balance, eventually that just lead me to more appropriately listening to my body.

So I don't think this thread is best put in the Zone section however I understand why it has ended up here. Coach Glassman and crossfit in general adopting the Zone as a Rxed performance diet has put it on the front page so to speak. Now that Robb Wolff has so cunningly described a more appropriate and malleable dietary design and labeled it the athletes Zone we have a bunch of CFers claiming they zone while in fact they are just eating a well put together performance diet based on the idea of refueling and increasing nutrient delivery and utilization through natural metabolic function within the human, as a species.

So what I was hoping to find myself in this thread was some information involving the aid of insulin sensitivity through a reduced intake of highly digestible carbohydrate sources throughout the day and utilizing the glycogen preferred storage window for refueling as well as a fat adapted metabolism through increased caloric intake of healthy fats. Leading to a conclusion that functioning on stored fuel is more efficient than eating a power bar before getting to the gym and constantly sucking down HFCS water while working out.

I will also hopefully be turning the RD at my place of employment onto these references so the clients I refer to the lovely woman (and I really mean that she is awesome) will be in the hands of someone who is at least informed as to why I hold these opinions and thus state the requests of her that I do.

Thanx for the time and attention of any who give it,
Liam
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Old 03-24-2009, 11:52 AM   #6
Liam Dougherty Springer
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Oh yeah lets not beat the fact that the Zone as Dr. Sears has outlined is so low calorie as to make recovery and performance far from ideal for a few, and just dangrouse and impossible for the rest. That horse is at the foot of someones bed by now.
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Old 03-24-2009, 12:42 PM   #7
Donald Lee
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Originally Posted by Liam Dougherty Springer View Post
MOD- I know Evan personally and what he needs more than anything is articles/study reviews that are peer reviewed which show benefits of diets conducive to the use of stored energy during exertion. Basically something to combat the idea that food fuels the function and more that food refuels depletion.

I along with many came into my current dietary plan of “eat what my body asks for when it asks for it” through a Paleo/Zone/IF approach and then playing around from there. But today I realize while the zone is a way to open my metabolism to a more proper hormonal balance, eventually that just lead me to more appropriately listening to my body.

So I don't think this thread is best put in the Zone section however I understand why it has ended up here. Coach Glassman and crossfit in general adopting the Zone as a Rxed performance diet has put it on the front page so to speak. Now that Robb Wolff has so cunningly described a more appropriate and malleable dietary design and labeled it the athletes Zone we have a bunch of CFers claiming they zone while in fact they are just eating a well put together performance diet based on the idea of refueling and increasing nutrient delivery and utilization through natural metabolic function within the human, as a species.

So what I was hoping to find myself in this thread was some information involving the aid of insulin sensitivity through a reduced intake of highly digestible carbohydrate sources throughout the day and utilizing the glycogen preferred storage window for refueling as well as a fat adapted metabolism through increased caloric intake of healthy fats. Leading to a conclusion that functioning on stored fuel is more efficient than eating a power bar before getting to the gym and constantly sucking down HFCS water while working out.

I will also hopefully be turning the RD at my place of employment onto these references so the clients I refer to the lovely woman (and I really mean that she is awesome) will be in the hands of someone who is at least informed as to why I hold these opinions and thus state the requests of her that I do.

Thanx for the time and attention of any who give it,
Liam
Liam,

IMO, a lot of what you've stated is false. There's a happy medium between the extremes of Zoners/CrossFitters and the common bodybuilding-influenced nutrition knowledge.

For example, why would running on stored fuel be more efficient than eating a powerbar before working out? If in your workout, you end up depleting your glycogen, you would probably wish you had that powerbar pre-workout.

Just as training prescriptions are all relative to the goals, nutrition is also relative to people's goals.

And nutrition for general health is different from nutrition for sports performance.
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Old 03-25-2009, 06:35 AM   #8
Darryl Shaw
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Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
I'd be more interested in a study comparing diet protocols of the SAME amount of calories and different ratios of macroutrient intake rather than you using every thread as an opportunity to dismiss everything but a high carb diet as ideal.
http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrit...fat_adaptation
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Old 03-25-2009, 07:25 AM   #9
Liam Dougherty Springer
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Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
That study was actually pretty cool... If the information is taken out of the context of only endurance athletes the protocol would IMO look more like this.

Muscle glycogen stores should be kept at an optimal level for the energy requirements of the athlete. Based on those energy requirements the most efficient way to restore glycogen is immediately PWO with High GI nutrient dense sources along with protein in order to aid recovery. The full amount of carbohydrates should be consumed within the first two hours as the metabolism prefers muscle glycogen storage within the recovery window and this will enable increased recovery for the next WO. Increased intramuscular Triglyceride storage and usage has been shown to improve athletic performance and increase available energy so having a diet composed of 35-55% fat by calories is optimal for appropriate metabolic response. (I got some of that from the study Donald posted and keep in mind that WAS for endurance athletes)

I don't think any one here is saying the Atkins diet is best for marathon runners (I am not). Carbohydrates play an important roll in energy availability and recovery and need to be in an athletes diet. In APROPRIATE amounts.
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