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Old 01-21-2007, 08:38 AM   #1
Frank Needham
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I carry my copy of SS around with me in my ruck just about everywhere and have gone over sections of it many times. When the moment allows I will open it up and just flip to some particular section that interests me at the time. Well, I did this the other day to review the section on the power clean and was again stuck by how great this book is and how chock full of ideas it is. The part I'm thinking of at this time is on page 158 starting in the first paragraph and describes how power and strength are related. In one or two sentences Rippetoe lays out the entire Westside philosophy and how to train the slow lifts as if they are O-lifts, yes thats right, O-lifts. He also describes another program that I'm not familiar with. I mean, there on that page alone there is enough material to develop workout programs that would last one for years to come and they are so effective. What an excellent book! If someone is fortunate enough to pick up this book at a very young age and had the focus to stick to it there is no telling what they might achieve. I thought that I was fortunate to have been taught weights in high school PE but sure would have liked to come across this at that time.
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Old 01-21-2007, 10:23 AM   #2
Mike ODonnell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Needham View Post
In one or two sentences Rippetoe lays out the entire Westside philosophy and how to train the slow lifts as if they are O-lifts, yes thats right, O-lifts.
Yep good stuff happens when you alternate heavy slower lifts and dynamic explosive lighter lifts.

Wish I had all this info when I was young and started lifting.....makes me wonder what kind of athlete I could have been with the right training....and not using the leg extension machine every day....
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Old 01-21-2007, 11:18 AM   #3
Chris Forbis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Needham View Post
I carry my copy of SS around with me in my ruck just about everywhere and have gone over sections of it many times.
I have done this as well. The 4 paragraph essay starting on page 6 is nearly worth the cost of the book itself. I keep a copy posted on the wall by my desk in my classroom. Gets me fired up to lift every single time...

I'm still relatively young (25) so I'm hoping that I can get my back situation sorted out so I can ride the SS program to monsterhood.
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Old 01-21-2007, 12:23 PM   #4
Steve Shafley
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Complex training, i.e. the coupling of a slow heavy movement, with a movement that's fast and "powerful" is a nice way to train (at least for a while). Very effective use of time.
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Old 01-21-2007, 12:34 PM   #5
Robert Allison
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Hi Steve,

You said:

Quote:
is a nice way to train (at least for a while)
Is this just re-stating the idea "everything works... for a while?" Of is there a specific reason that you feel this type of training would eventually deliver diminishing returns?

Just curious...

Robert
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Old 01-21-2007, 07:59 PM   #6
Steve Shafley
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Yeah, it's just me stating the obvious.

For most, something's going to give, whether it is boredom, adaptation, or whatever.

I can run something like that with the same exercises for 3-6 weeks before it really stagnates.

Like:

bench + explosive push-up (or push-up depth "jumps")

squats + squat jumps (either bw or holding dbs)

Or switching the exercise order.
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Old 01-22-2007, 06:28 AM   #7
Scott Kustes
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I just started reading it yesterday and I'm about halfway through the squat chapter. This book is worth more than its weight in gold.
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Old 01-23-2007, 06:23 PM   #8
Steve Shafley
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Over on Stef's blog, ( Rip's girlfriend) she has some outright hilarious pages from some of his old training journals.

"Fell down stairs"
"Horse fell on right leg"
"Had the Flu"
"Asshole hurts"

http://www.monsteress.com/
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Old 01-23-2007, 07:09 PM   #9
Robert McBee
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What was that for breakfast in the pic under Rip's training logs? Looks like a plate of ham, eggs, and 6 oreo cookies. Maybe that's just wishful thinking to my carb-starved brain.
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Old 01-23-2007, 09:07 PM   #10
Greg Everett
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Forget the oreos and the asshole pain--what is the story with Rip's cape?
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