Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Endurance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-20-2010, 04:58 PM   #1
Daniel Gam
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 47
Default running stride frequency

i heard a general rule that good runners tend to run at an increased stride frequency (~180 steps a minute) and that it would benefit the average person to do the same in terms of efficiency and reduced injury.

i was wondering if anyone knows what happens when good runners change speeds e.g. running a 5K v marathon, does the frequency stay constant and the length of each stride change or does the frequency change and the stride length remain constant. or a combination of both. and how is this relevant to the average slower runner?
Daniel Gam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 11:59 AM   #2
Shane Skowron
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 227
Default

When athletes go faster it's the stride length that should increase, not the stride frequency. I don't believe it's possible to get your stride frequency beyond a certain threshold. Even the world's most elite sprinters don't try to make their legs move faster, but rather they try to produce more force with each step.

The same applies to distance running. When you speed up from a 8 minute mile to a 7 minute mile, you probably don't take that many more steps, but instead try to make each step go further.

I'm no elite runner or anything but I think the whole 90 cadence/180 step thing is a little overplayed. It might be helpful as a rough guide when learning how to adjust your running pace, but I don't see the value of it beyond that.
Shane Skowron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2010, 02:39 PM   #3
Steven Low
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,091
Default

You should be comfortable/relaxed while running or sprinting. Whatever stride frequency your body will naturally set is whatever that is.

Plyometrics, getting stronger, etc tend to increase stride length.
__________________
Posts NOT intended as professional medical, training or nutrition advice.
Site // Bodyweight Strength Training Article // Overcoming Gravity Bodyweight Book
Steven Low is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 06:07 AM   #4
Daniel Gam
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 47
Default

I have lots of friends that run and most of them seem to have a lot of problems with there knees and such, and I was thinking that increasing frequency would be the least crazy sounding suggestion (as opposed to forefoot striking or wearing shoes with less cushioning) that would be helpful for them
Daniel Gam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 09:11 AM   #5
Shane Skowron
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 227
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Gam View Post
I have lots of friends that run and most of them seem to have a lot of problems with there knees and such, and I was thinking that increasing frequency would be the least crazy sounding suggestion (as opposed to forefoot striking or wearing shoes with less cushioning) that would be helpful for them
How would that possibly solve a knee issue?
Shane Skowron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 10:08 AM   #6
Donald Lee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 646
Default

Lyle posted this on a discussion about POSE and whatnot.

Quote:
J Strength Cond Res. 2007 Aug;21(3):888-93.
Foot strike patterns of runners at the 15-km point during an elite-level half marathon.

Hasegawa H, Yamauchi T, Kraemer WJ.
Laboratory of Exercise Science, Department of Business Management, Ryukoku University, Kyoto, Japan. hiroshi515@aol.com
Abstract

There are various recommendations by many coaches regarding foot landing techniques in distance running that are meant to improve running performance and prevent injuries. Several studies have investigated the kinematic and kinetic differences between rearfoot strike (RFS), midfoot strike (MFS), and forefoot strike (FFS) patterns at foot landing and their effects on running efficiency on a treadmill and over ground conditions. However, little is known about the actual condition of the foot strike pattern during an actual road race at the elite level of competition. The purpose of the present study was to document actual foot strike patterns during a half marathon in which elite international level runners, including Olympians, compete. Four hundred fifteen runners were filmed by 2 120-Hz video cameras in the height of 0.15 m placed at the 15.0-km point and obtained sagittal foot landing and taking off images for 283 runners. Rearfoot strike was observed in 74.9% of all analyzed runners, MFS in 23.7%, and FFS in 1.4%. The percentage of MFS was higher in the faster runners group, when all runners were ranked and divided into 50 runner groups at the 15.0-km point of the competition. In the top 50, which included up to the 69th place runner in actual order who passed the 15-km point at 45 minutes, 53 second (this speed represents 5.45 m x s(-1), or 15 minutes, 17 seconds per 5 km), RFS, MFS, and FFS were 62.0, 36.0, and 2.0%, respectively. Contact time (CT) clearly increased for the slower runners, or the placement order increased (r = 0.71, p < or = 0.05). The CT for RFS + FFS for every 50 runners group significantly increased with increase of the placement order. The CT for RFS was significantly longer than MFS + FFS (200.0 +/- 21.3 vs. 183.0 +/- 16 millisecond). Apparent inversion (INV) of the foot at the foot strike was observed in 42% of all runners. The percentage of INV for MFS was higher than for RFS and FFS (62.5, 32.0, and 50%, respectively). The CT with INV for MFS + FFS was significantly shorter than the CT with and without INV for RFS. Furthermore, the CT with INV was significantly shorter than push-off time without INV for RFS. The findings of this study indicate that foot strike patterns are related to running speed. The percentage of RFS increases with the decreasing of the running speed; conversely, the percentage of MFS increases as the running speed increases. A shorter contact time and a higher frequency of inversion at the foot contact might contribute to higher running economy.
Donald Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 04:04 PM   #7
Steven Low
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,091
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Gam View Post
I have lots of friends that run and most of them seem to have a lot of problems with there knees and such, and I was thinking that increasing frequency would be the least crazy sounding suggestion (as opposed to forefoot striking or wearing shoes with less cushioning) that would be helpful for them
Perhaps they should read this instead.

http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2009/1...-dysfunctions/
__________________
Posts NOT intended as professional medical, training or nutrition advice.
Site // Bodyweight Strength Training Article // Overcoming Gravity Bodyweight Book
Steven Low is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2010, 02:20 PM   #8
Todd Rehm
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 16
Default

I've said this before in numerous forums, but here's my .02 on footstrike.

I don't believe that what part of the foot strikes first is as important as where the foot is in relation to the center-of-gravity.

Faster and more-efficient runners tend to have the foot impact right below the center-of-gravity, sometimes a little behind it.

Slower, less efficient runners tend to have the foot impact in front of the center-of-gravity, which causes more knee problems and causes a "braking" effect upon impact.

Having your foot strike under COG or behind will often accompany a midfoot or forefoot strike, and having the foot strike in front of COG will almost always accompany a rearfoot strike.

YMMV.
Todd Rehm is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:55 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator