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Old 02-10-2011, 09:11 AM   #1
Scott Hanson
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Default Gluten Causes Symptoms in non-Celiac Patients

Not exactly a smoking gun, considering the subjects had IBS, but interesting confirmation of CW:

http://www.canibaisereis.com/downloa...out-celiac.pdf
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Old 02-11-2011, 07:19 AM   #2
Garrett Smith
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I'm of the opinion that gluten causes symptoms in everybody if consumed in large enough doses over time, and if people actually pay attention.

My wife just realized this for herself.
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:58 AM   #3
Darryl Shaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Hanson View Post
Not exactly a smoking gun, considering the subjects had IBS, but interesting confirmation of CW:

http://www.canibaisereis.com/downloa...out-celiac.pdf
Unless I'm missing something all they've done is show that a small group of IBS sufferers who were able to control their sypmtoms on a gluten free diet reacted badly when fed gluten. They found no evidence of intestinal inflammation, damage or latent celiac disease that might explain their symptoms though so this study doesn't really tell us anything about how gluten may affect the general population.

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Originally Posted by Garrett Smith View Post
I'm of the opinion that gluten causes symptoms in everybody if consumed in large enough doses over time, and if people actually pay attention.

My wife just realized this for herself.
"All things are poison and nothing is without poison, only the dose permits something not to be poisonous." - Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim a.k.a. Paracelsus.
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Old 02-12-2011, 07:36 AM   #4
Garrett Smith
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Gluten/celiac science in medicine is coming out of its Middle Age.
https://www.enterolab.com/StaticPage...Diagnosis.aspx
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Evidence of this comes from a study that I performed. We tested 227 normal volunteers with blood tests for celiac disease. Twenty-five of these people (11%) had either antigliadin IgG or IgA in their blood versus only one (0.4%) that had antiendomysial, antitissue transglutaminase, and antigliadin IgA in the blood. So for every one person in a population that has the antibodies that have 100% specificity for celiac disease of the intestine (antiendomysial and antitissue transglutaminase), there are 24 that have antibodies to gliadin that may not have celiac disease. So what is going on with the 11% with antigliadin antibodies in blood? Are these false positives (rhetorically)? You’re telling me that there is a disease called celiac disease and it is associated with antibodies to gliadin in the blood and sometimes it damages the intestine? But people with antigliadin antibody in their blood but no other antibodies do not have a clinically significant immunologic reaction to gluten? Do you see the problem? How can 11% be false positives? What about the 89% with none of these antibodies? You cannot equate having no antibodies at all (a negative test) with having antigliadin antibodies alone. If you have antibodies to gliadin, something is going on here. Where there’s smoke there’s fire. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis: that an antigliadin antibody alone does indicate the presence of an immune reaction to gluten that may be clinically important. Using tests for intestinal malabsorption and abnormal permeability (i.e., tests of small bowel function, unlike a biopsy which says nothing about function), we found that 45% of people with only an antigliadin IgG or IgA antibody in blood (without either antiendomysial or antitissue transglutaminase antibody) already had measurable intestinal dysfunction, compared to only 5% of people with no antibodies to gliadin in their blood. When we did biopsies of these people’s intestines, none had villous atrophy with only a few showing some early inflammation. Thus, having an antigliadin antibody in your blood does mean something: that there is nearly a 1 in 2 chance that functional intestinal damage is already present even though it may not be visible structurally at the resolution attained by a light microscope assessment of a biopsy.

As mentioned at the outset, not all gluten sensitive individuals develop villous atrophy. Evidence for this has been around for a long time. In 1980, a medical publication titled "Gluten-Sensitive Diarrhea" reported that 8 people with chronic diarrhea, sometimes for as long as 20 years, that resolved completely when treated with a gluten-free diet, had mild small bowel inflammation but no villous atrophy. In 1996 in a paper called “Gluten Sensitivity with Mild Enteropathy,” ten patients, who were thought to have celiac disease because of a positive antiendomysial antibody blood test, had small bowel biopsies showing no villous atrophy. But amazingly, these biopsies were shown to react to gluten when put in a Petri dish, proving the tissue immunologically reacted to gluten (which was likely anyway from their positive blood tests). Two other reports from Europe published in 2001 showed gluten sensitivity without villous atrophy (and hence without celiac disease). In one of these studies, 30% of patients with abdominal symptoms suggestive of irritable bowel syndrome having the celiac-like HLA-DQ2 gene but no antibodies to gliadin in their blood, had these antibodies detected in intestinal fluid (obtained by placing a tube down into the small intestine). Thus, in these people with intestinal symptoms, but normal blood tests and biopsies, the antigliadin antibodies were only inside the intestine (where they belong if you consider that the immune stimulating gluten also is inside the intestine), not in the blood. This is the theme we have followed in my research, as we are about to see.

More proof that patients in these studies were gluten sensitivity came from the fact that they all got better on a gluten-free diet, and developed recurrent symptoms when "challenged" with gluten. Although the gluten-sensitive patients in these studies did not have the villous atrophy that would yield a diagnosis of celiac disease, small bowel biopsies in many of them showed some, albeit minimal, inflammatory abnormalities. Yet, when a symptomatic patient in clinical practice is biopsied and found to have only minimal abnormalities on small bowel biopsy, clinicians do not put any stock in the possibility of their having gluten sensitivity. As much as I would like to take credit for the concept, you can see from these studies that I did not invent the idea that not all gluten sensitive patients have villous atrophy. It has been around for at least 23 years, and reported from different parts of the world.
Darryl, there is also something particularly bad about "American" gluten. Both myself and other clinicians report that people here who are highly sensitive to gluten go on vacation to Europe and are suddenly able to eat bread and other wheat products with no obvious negative effects (so obviously they increased their dose of supposed "poison" with less effect on them).

We Americans are leading the race to kill ourselves, with most of it led by Monsanto.
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