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Old 10-09-2008, 10:26 AM   #1
John Haydon Boatner
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Default Carb choices

What are some good carb choices post workout. Are granolas, oatmeal, yogurt, fruit, and yams all good stuff?
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Old 10-09-2008, 11:08 AM   #2
George Mounce
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I wouldn't put yogurt as a primary carb source, the rest would work fine yes.
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Old 10-09-2008, 12:18 PM   #3
Kevin Perry
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I have actually mixed plain yogurt with frozen fruit and milk + whey for a post-WO shake which is great but Im not sure what your overall current diet is.
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Old 10-09-2008, 01:07 PM   #4
Mike ODonnell
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Fruit in moderation.....as your liver can only hold so much glycogen (like 80g) from fructose...then it goes into fat.
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:49 PM   #5
Fenthis Glusos
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Do you know how much fruit it would take to get to 80g of fructose? A LOT, on average a piece of fruit has about 4.5 grams. Soda pop has more like 60g.

Fruit is excellent, healthy -- when you tell ordinary people about the whole fructose concern they just won't eat it and instead have a trashy muffin ("oh look, muffins...they're healthy right?") or something. Seriously, people today are really THIS dumb.

The fruit scare is ridiculous. 2 pieces of fruit is considered a lot to your average joe. haha

Let's face it, the whole sugar craze in America has made fruit non-delectable to the masses. If you tell your average joe that he can eat an infinite amount of fruit, he will tire after the second bite of the first one.

In essence, fruit has far less sugar in it than people attribute to it. There are groups of people that live off of fruit entirely (probably not the wisest choice, but...) and have no sugar/weight related issues -- the same cannot be said for someone who lives entirely off of cake.


As per original question: brown rice is tasty...and eat fish as it tends to increase carb tolerance.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:22 PM   #6
George Mounce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fenthis Glusos View Post
Do you know how much fruit it would take to get to 80g of fructose? A LOT, on average a piece of fruit has about 4.5 grams. Soda pop has more like 60g.

Fruit is excellent, healthy -- when you tell ordinary people about the whole fructose concern they just won't eat it and instead have a trashy muffin or something. Seriously, people today are really THIS dumb.

The fruit scare is ridiculous. 2 pieces of fruit is considered a lot to your average joe. haha

Let's face it, the whole sugar craze in America has made fruit non-delectable to the masses. If you tell your average joe that he can eat an infinite amount of fruit, he will tire after the second bite of the first one.

In essence, fruit has far less sugar in it than people attribute to it. There are groups of people that live off of fruit entirely (probably not the wisest choice, but...) and have no sugar/weight related issues -- the same cannot be said for someone who lives entirely off of cake.


As per original question: brown rice is tasty...and eat fish as it tends to increase carb tolerance.
Huh?

Here are 7 fruits with sugar content I randomly picked that are pretty common.

Apple 23g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1809/2
Banana 17g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1846/2
Fig 10g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1884/2
Date 16g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/7348/2
Orange 17g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1966/2
Grapefruit 16g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1905/2

Your "average" piece has a lot more than 4.5g of sugar. I'm not against fruit at all, but we must be realistic with our numbers before just stating them. High fruit consumption can easily put someone into high carb eating.

2 pieces of the right fruit can put you in the same league as those new 100 calorie cans of soda.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:37 PM   #7
Fenthis Glusos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Mounce View Post
Huh?

Here are 7 fruits with sugar content I randomly picked that are pretty common.

Apple 23g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1809/2
Banana 17g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1846/2
Fig 10g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1884/2
Date 16g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/7348/2
Orange 17g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1966/2
Grapefruit 16g http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/f...-juices/1905/2

Your "average" piece has a lot more than 4.5g of sugar. I'm not against fruit at all, but we must be realistic with our numbers before just stating them. High fruit consumption can easily put someone into high carb eating.

2 pieces of the right fruit can put you in the same league as those new 100 calorie cans of soda.

No because we're talking about fructose content not pure sugar content for liver glycogen.

Fruit has a mixture of different sugars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructose


check out the fructose content of some of the fruits in that chart and see that a banana is practically split 50/50 with fructose/glucose at the 4/5 gram range. Soda pop has 60 grams of fructose -- practically 12 times that of fruit!

As you can tell, I'm not a fan of low-carb diets when they exclude whole foods like fruit. Give me a break...fruit is a food that we've been designed to eat, "zone" bars are not.

In fact, I operate best on a high-carb diet consisting of fruits and vegetables with a little meat, some nuts, rice and natural yoghurt. Carbs found in whole foods are not the enemy, processed food is. Sure, everyone is different, but everyone would benefit from eating real foods instead of replacement foods i.e. zone bars, protein shakes.

I'm sure you agree with me here, just getting stuff off my chest. haha.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:58 PM   #8
George Mounce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fenthis Glusos View Post
No because we're talking about fructose content not pure sugar content for liver glycogen.

Fruit has a mixture of different sugars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructose


check out the fructose content of some of the fruits in that chart and see that a banana is practically split 50/50 with fructose/glucose at the 4/5 gram range. Soda pop has 60 grams of fructose -- practically 12 times that of fruit!

As you can tell, I'm not a fan of low-carb diets when they exclude whole foods like fruit. Give me a break...just stop eating muffins instead.
Actually, he asked about carb choices post workout and it got derailed, I'm probably part of the problem here.

I frankly don't agree with you at all about fruit, and I'll leave it at that.

You give a small child an orange and a piece of broccoli, I can tell you without even batting an eyelash which they are going for as their brain is craving the one with more CHOs. I don't need a huge amount of medical literature nor a definition of left and right-handed sugar to figure it out.

(And just to give a happy list, here is a list of the amount of fructose in fruits)
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Old 10-09-2008, 06:03 PM   #9
Fenthis Glusos
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orange or broccoli? So what, there is no lesser good there.

That chart is also for a 200 calorie serving, do you know how many oranges that is just to get to 80 grams of fructose? A lot. Also, I see a lot of dried fruit up high...everyone should know why.

You have to look at the whole picture; bottom line, the fructose in fruit is not that much, averaging about 4.5-7 grams per serving -- 2-3 grams for an orange

I'd rather see someone eat 20 oranges a day instead of one zone bar.

*** It'll take about 30 oranges to reach 80 grams of fructose. Do the math from that chart by looking at the calories:

calories in an orange = about 60

grams of fructose in 200 calories of orange = about 9

approximately 3.3 oranges for 9 grams of fructose --> 80/9 = 8.9 --> 8.9 x 3.3 = 30 oranges to reach 80g of fructose.

1 and 1/4 can of pop for the same. Choose wisely.


Topic is not derailed: Fruit was questioned in the OP and fruit has been delivered as an ideal carb source, unless of course carbs themselves are the enemy -- which they're not.

Its the same tin-foil hat thought people in the crossfit community adhere to - the fruit scare, yet they have no problem shoveling ice cream down their throats and then to have the audacity to say that a few servings of fruit may be detrimental.

...On a side note, I've been known to eat about 20 clementines in one day when needed.
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Old 10-09-2008, 06:53 PM   #10
Kevin Perry
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hmm, to the OP:

MOD and George are probably trying to get at the point that too much fruit has a lot of sugar which is what you initially want to avoid thus keeping fruits in moderation. Otherwise like MOD said, too much sugar into the liver eventually will store as fat since the culprit of everything is that.. sugar.

I think your list is fine with the exception of fruits, just keep them to moderation and also keep starches out of the diet. You just want enough carbs to restore glycogen depletion...

Anyone can correct me if im wrong on that...
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