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Old 11-10-2008, 06:13 PM   #21
George Mounce
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In the Zen/Buddhism world its called samadhi. If you've even been doing something so intently that you forget the outside world, that is a form of samadhi. I guaruntee if you lift weights like that, you will lift a ton of weight.

I'm that way with many things, I am doing them so intently that it literally takes my wife coming up beside me and hitting me to break my concentration. It is a very, very interesting state of mind. One day I hope to obtain absolute samadhi, and maybe even what is termed kensho.

So if you haven't guessed it yet, every day I spend at least 15 minutes meditating using the bamboo method of Zen meditation.
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Old 11-11-2008, 04:53 AM   #22
Gavin Jones
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When putting the question out there I was originally thinking along the lines of NLP like what Chris suggests here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Salvato View Post

Finally, when I am ready to lift, i say to myself as i do it:
1) Stance
2) Grip
3) Shins
4) Chest
......
......
5) PULL

By the time I get to realizing I passed Step 5 the bar is either on my shoulder/over my head or its a fail.
> I try to clear my mind, walk onto the platform and as Im setting up my stance I say to myself 'I own the platform and cage', then follow the steps chris mentions above as a mental checklist but without actually saying it in my head. Then boom! do the lift.

> All the other stuff is great as well. Love the Yoda quote, think I may say that in my head from now on! (in yodas voice)

Gav
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Old 11-11-2008, 11:08 PM   #23
Ben Moskowitz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Mounce View Post
So if you haven't guessed it yet, every day I spend at least 15 minutes meditating using the bamboo method of Zen meditation.

What does this involve?
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Old 11-12-2008, 05:31 AM   #24
Susie Rosenberg
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Yes.

This fading away of everything except the moment is what I have missed most during my seven months of mostly-down time recovering from having my neck rebuilt.

I guess it's no accident that I started learning T'ai Chi as my first foray back into physical movement. I discovered that I could have that same sense of emptiness of mind, pure existence where time falls away and has no meaning, during T'ai Chi practice. I had thought that only way to that white-pointed state of utter emptiness was through a Crossfit metcon. At least that was my experience before my surgery.

I suppose, in a very Buddhist way, I needed this surgery to open doors to other pathways to being. I've learned to experience complete focus in T'ai Chi and my dance classes, which are gentle physically, but require focus and precision.

I still wanna get strong, though.

Susise
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Old 11-12-2008, 09:06 AM   #25
glennpendlay
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I think this quote is appropriate for this thread.

"At the peak of tremendous and victorious effort, while the blood is pounding in your head, all suddenly becomes quiet within you. Everything seems clearer and whiter than ever before, as if great spotlights had been turned on. At that moment, you have the conviction that you contain all the power in the world, that you are capable of everything, that you have wings. There is no more precious moment in life than this, the white moment, and you will work very hard for years just to taste it again. -- Yuri Vlasov, Soviet Weightlifter

I believe I have felt what he is talking about here a couple of times in each of the main sports I have done, wrestling, powerlifting, and Olympic weightlifting. I will always remember each time I felt this way. When it happens to you, you will know it, and it is at this time that your mind is truly right, and prepared for maximal effort.

glenn
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Old 11-12-2008, 09:42 AM   #26
Garrett Smith
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Susie,
I think as "westerners" we tend to get into that state most easily through intense physical effort. The only problem with that is our ability to maintain that effort and the toll it takes on our body to get there.

Tai chi, and other related practices, will allow for one to remain there longer and quite likely make the body healthier over time (a long time!).

I like getting there both ways, yoga - gymnastics - OL all get me there a bit differently.
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Old 11-12-2008, 09:50 AM   #27
Mark Gleason
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I am a fairly laid back guy, so I never use the 'psyche up' routine.
I don't get angry or talk smack, just walk up to the bar set it up, breathe in and pull... perhaps that's why my lifts suck...
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Old 11-12-2008, 09:50 AM   #28
Gant Grimes
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The more moving parts you have in your pre-lift routine, the more chance you have of messing something up. Mind like water, people.

I clear my mind, visualize what I want to do next, and go do it. This applies to any sport or activity. If it's weightlifting, I crack my neck, walk up, get my grip, and go. I lift it or I don't. The whole process takes a few seconds.

I used to compartmentalize depending on the sport or situation, but it was too many routines to keep up with. Learning to properly visualize outcomes was the best lesson I learned. You've done the movement thousands of times before, and you've just done it again in your head. What you do next is only a natural outcome of what has already happened. No big deal.

You Buddhists should drink some spirits read Morihei Ueshiba's stuff.


"Cast off limiting thoughts and return to true emptiness. Stand in the midst of the Great Void. This is the secret of the Way of a Warrior."


or

"The contest has already been decided from the beginning, Merely by having the intention to fight with one who embodies the universe, my attacker has fixed his mind on violating the harmony of nature itself. In other words, the moment my attacker fixes his attention on fighting with me, he has already lost."
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Last edited by Gant Grimes : 11-12-2008 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 11-12-2008, 10:20 AM   #29
Arden Cogar Jr.
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If I can find that stuff in a downloadable form, I'm all for it. I drive a lot for work and that's a perfect time to introspect and not text or email on my phone.

The only reading "for pleasure" I do is on these sites. That's sad really.

All the best,
Arden

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post
The more moving parts you have in your pre-lift routine, the more chance you have of messing something up. Mind like water, people.

I clear my mind, visualize what I want to do next, and go do it. This applies to any sport or activity. If it's weightlifting, I crack my neck, walk up, get my grip, and go. I lift it or I don't. The whole process takes a few seconds.

I used to compartmentalize depending on the sport or situation, but it was too many routines to keep up with. Learning to properly visualize outcomes was the best lesson I learned. You've done the movement thousands of times before, and you've just done it again in your head. What you do next is only a natural outcome of what has already happened. No big deal.

You Buddhists should drink some spirits read Morihei Ueshiba's stuff.


"Cast off limiting thoughts and return to true emptiness. Stand in the midst of the Great Void. This is the secret of the Way of a Warrior."


or

"The contest has already been decided from the beginning, Merely by having the intention to fight with one who embodies the universe, my attacker has fixed his mind on violating the harmony of nature itself. In other words, the moment my attacker fixes his attention on fighting with me, he has already lost."
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Old 11-12-2008, 10:22 AM   #30
Arden Cogar Jr.
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Same with me.

I've actually found that my ability to obtain that state is a lot easier when I'm lifting and competing. I have a tendency to drift when I'm performing my yoga and tai chi. I think it has more to do with the length and amount of focus I need to put myself under. If that makes any sense?

All the best,
Arden


Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett Smith View Post
Susie,
I think as "westerners" we tend to get into that state most easily through intense physical effort. The only problem with that is our ability to maintain that effort and the toll it takes on our body to get there.

Tai chi, and other related practices, will allow for one to remain there longer and quite likely make the body healthier over time (a long time!).

I like getting there both ways, yoga - gymnastics - OL all get me there a bit differently.
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