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Old 07-20-2010, 10:48 AM   #31
Derek Simonds
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Originally Posted by Grissim Connery View Post
i guess i'm gonna have to get the book

i've always been a jump rope fan. is he not in favor of them?
From what I have read jump ropes are cool. I am no means an expert on what he is writing. I bookmarked several pieces to come back to read when I was fresh. The only really equipment focused parts so far are the heart rate monitor and when doing HICT he advocates the versa climber or spin bike.

From what I have read most of the training can be like Anton has said where you are doing mma or bjj specific drills while maintaining your specific HR for that time period.
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Old 07-20-2010, 12:44 PM   #32
Donald Lee
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From what I have read most of the training can be like Anton has said where you are doing mma or bjj specific drills while maintaining your specific HR for that time period.
That's not quite accurate.

Joel follows the model of genderal conditioning followed by specific conditioning.

To get the most out of your aerobic training, it's ideal to train 4-6 days/week. During the aerobic/cardiac output (whatever it's called) block, you can get some of that from your mma/bjj training. The rest you fill in with cardiac output and/or whatever else.

Closer toward a fight or competition, the blocks get more specific. In the last 8 weeks, most of the S&C encorporates specific technique drills.

Stuff like running, VersaClimber, and Tempo method pushups/lat pulldowns all fall under general conditioning.

In blocks without an aerobic component as either the primary or secondary focus, aerobic adaptations are maintained through your mma/bjj training. If you aren't able to maintain them b/c you're not doing enough mma/bjj training or whatever, then you have to do some separate maintenance work.
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Old 07-20-2010, 02:04 PM   #33
Yael Grauer
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I have just been following the program as its laid out, in the indicated order. I am just doing BJJ as well, no MMA.
I think what I'm going to do is pick the areas I am weakest in (such as metcon right now, actually, since I've been doing Max Strength) and focus on those phases first.
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Old 07-20-2010, 02:20 PM   #34
Derek Simonds
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That's not quite accurate.

Joel follows the model of genderal conditioning followed by specific conditioning.

To get the most out of your aerobic training, it's ideal to train 4-6 days/week. During the aerobic/cardiac output (whatever it's called) block, you can get some of that from your mma/bjj training. The rest you fill in with cardiac output and/or whatever else.

Closer toward a fight or competition, the blocks get more specific. In the last 8 weeks, most of the S&C encorporates specific technique drills.

Stuff like running, VersaClimber, and Tempo method pushups/lat pulldowns all fall under general conditioning.

In blocks without an aerobic component as either the primary or secondary focus, aerobic adaptations are maintained through your mma/bjj training. If you aren't able to maintain them b/c you're not doing enough mma/bjj training or whatever, then you have to do some separate maintenance work.
Like I said I am only through the aerobic stuff so far. I am going to try and finish the book tonight so I can see the big picture.
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Old 07-20-2010, 03:24 PM   #35
Joe Hart
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I had to re-read it a few times for stuff to sink in. The thing that was weird for me was the fact that you strength trained 2x a week and conditioned probably 2-3x a week that was not MMA related.

It seemed that if you use an MMA / BJJ skill to condition with it was better. Yeah its a bummer some of the stuff requires things that I don't have (versaclimber, spin bike). There are always lunges up a hill for 10 min.
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Old 07-20-2010, 05:16 PM   #36
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If you read all of the ridiculously long Sherdog thread that Joel started and all the articles on his site before reading the book, things make a bit more sense when you read the book for the first time.

You guys might benefit from reading this thread over on mixedmartialarts.com. Joel doesn't get into any specifics, but you should get a better sense of his approach to MMA based on his arguments.

http://www.mixedmartialarts.com/mma....1650816&page=1
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Old 07-20-2010, 05:31 PM   #37
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Yesterday i did Helen using the Threshold training guidelines. Kept my HR in the appropriate range, stopped when it got to high, and rested to HR 130 between rounds. It was easy enough to manage.

I really wish i had access to a spin bike for the HICT training. I suppose i could just do 10 min of box step ups, but that sounds totally mind numbing.


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Old 07-20-2010, 10:36 PM   #38
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Thought you BJJ guys might like this. Here are a couple responses by Joel about whether BJJ is aerobic-lactic.

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It's going to depend a lot on an indvidual's style. Some guys are higher pressure and faster paced than others. Some will sit there and hold position and slowly work until they get something then they'll explode, while others work work work until their opponent makes a mistake and they capitalize. There is probably more lactic system that comes into play than MMA, but how much more has a lot to do with someone's technique and tactics.
Quote:
Look at your average heart rates while you're rolling BJJ to get some ideas. Keeping in mind all HR will be lower because of the positions of BJJ compared to standing. The better people get in BJJ, the more aerobic alactic they tend to become. Less experienced grapplers often try to use muscle more than technique and are not nearly as fluid as they should be so they waste a ton of unecssary energy.

Top level grapplers are masters at efficient energy expenditure and it seems like they can go on and on and maintain their strength and power simply because they are very effective at controlling how much energy they are using. I'm sure I've used this analogy before, but It's like trying to play raquetball against an old person who has been playing it forever. You can be younger, quicker, more athletic, and even better conditioned, but you'll be running all over the court chasing everything down while they will barely be moving out of a 5'x5' box in the middle of the court. You'll be gassed and barely moving while some guy with a beer gut in his 50s or even 60s stands there laughing at you.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:13 AM   #39
Grissim Connery
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The thing that was weird for me was the fact that you strength trained 2x a week and conditioned probably 2-3x a week that was not MMA related.
now that i'm able to train 5x/week again, this makes sense to me. strength training is harder when everything just hurts
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:50 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Anton Emery View Post
Yesterday i did Helen using the Threshold training guidelines. Kept my HR in the appropriate range, stopped when it got to high, and rested to HR 130 between rounds. It was easy enough to manage.
Anton
i was kinda wondering about something like this. you guys mentioned that the versa climber or bike are preferred b/c you can crank the resistance so that strength is maintained in the long run even after doing a lot of cardio and the upper body is taxed. why can't somebody just deadlift as their cardio if they maintained the heart rate and had a weight that limited them to like 4-10 reps per minute? after i would think that this would cause one to get really sore, but then wouldn't one get just as sore on a bike or something if the resistance was just as hard?
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