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Old 09-04-2010, 08:37 PM   #11
Blair Lowe
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One of my gymnasts comes from a family where they eat mostly hunted meat. They eat little to no fish or seafood but do buy chicken and eggs (something in the works, I hear). Lots of deer, buffalo, pheasant, quail, turkey, etc.

The kid is also extremely strong. I've often wondered if it helped during his training but he has never really trained more than 10 hours a week and is a low level gymnast moving on to mid level gymnastics (competitive). His little brother who does not train is still stronger than most of the kids in his class. Polar opposite though.
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Old 09-07-2010, 09:20 AM   #12
Brian Stone
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Originally Posted by Chad Cilli View Post
Well.... alot of things are largely anecdotal. I believe I heard Robb state once that the existence of the universe is largely anecdotal. But in any case, research studies have also proven alot of BS. I've seen studies where they insisted that high carb diets were better. I've seen studies that found that eating meat was bad for you. At every family gathering, my vegan cousin brings me another study "proving" that eating meat is bad.

All I can say is what works for me. Eating more omega-3s makes me feel better whether it's from drinking fish oil or eating free range grass fed beef. I noticed the difference when I switched from conventional foods to foods with more omega-3s, and when I go on vacation and don't have those foods available, I can feel the difference then too.

If you want a case study, my 66 year old uncle lives on a farm in Kentucky and all the animals are free to roam, so the eggs, dairy, beef, chickens, goats, etc are all free range and grass fed. At 66, he can still do 30 dead hang pullups. I'd like to think that his diet plays some role in his health. You don't see too many men in their 60s who can do 10 pullups let alone 30.
By no means would I fault anyone for doing what works best for them. I just see a lot of advice online telling people to eat this type of egg rather than that one, only grassfed meat, organic veggies, etc. It's true that you can find rogue studies that prove a lot of things, but the core of science is that it is testable and repeatable. if studies come out that legitimately and repeatedly call into question the consumption of a certain quantity of various types of meat, then that will hold weight in the scientific community.

Darryl's linked study is a start. This is a process and science often calls into questions its own formal claims. However, using anecdotal evidence is risky strictly because of confirmation bias, which is the reason why double-blind studies are so important. If you expect something to work better and all your knowledge / beliefs on the subject lead you to believe that is true, chances are that something will work better for you.

I'm not saying that one type of egg is or is not better, and I'm genuinely interested in the data. If there is a mountain of data out there that's persuasive to the nutritional community, then i'd be interested in seeing it. My own bias leads me to suspect that things developed in accordance with their natural evolution (e.g. meat from free-roaming animals) is going to be superior, but at the same time a molecule developed in "nature" is identical to that same molecule developed in a laboratory. That's obviously a simplification but it's illustrative of what I mean.
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Old 09-07-2010, 09:42 AM   #13
Arien Malec
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Originally Posted by Brian Stone View Post
If there is a mountain of data out there that's persuasive to the nutritional community, then i'd be interested in seeing it.
I'm more interested in avoiding eggs that don't come with a mountain of shit.

Here's a somewhat self-interested research, but given where university funding comes from these days, self-interested research is probably the best we've got:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/eggs.aspx
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Old 09-09-2010, 04:53 AM   #14
Brook Ferguson
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have any of you guys seen food inc? man, watch that and u would never buy a normal egg again....
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Old 09-09-2010, 04:19 PM   #15
Wayne Riddle
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have any of you guys seen food inc? man, watch that and u would never buy a normal egg again....
Watched it, doesn't phase me. I could snack on sausage sticks while touring a slaughter house.
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Old 09-10-2010, 12:13 AM   #16
Brook Ferguson
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Watched it, doesn't phase me. I could snack on sausage sticks while touring a slaughter house.
wow im impressed.

turned me off grain fed everything for like, ever.....
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Old 11-04-2010, 01:04 PM   #17
Ryan M. Scott
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Originally Posted by Brian Stone View Post
I'm not saying that one type of egg is or is not better, and I'm genuinely interested in the data. If there is a mountain of data out there that's persuasive to the nutritional community, then i'd be interested in seeing it. My own bias leads me to suspect that things developed in accordance with their natural evolution (e.g. meat from free-roaming animals) is going to be superior, but at the same time a molecule developed in "nature" is identical to that same molecule developed in a laboratory. That's obviously a simplification but it's illustrative of what I mean.
In terms of products being labeled "organic", it's not an oversimplification at all. Ceteris paribus, "organic" products are nutritionally identical to factory farm products.

Grass-fed, free-range beef/chicken/eggs are all marginally more nutritious in terms of omega-3's and certain vitamins (vitamin E for instance) than their feedlot counterparts. However, if you eat a diet rich in greens, seeds, nuts, olive oil, and fish, then you're probably getting all the omega-3's and vitamins you need from those sources.
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Old 11-15-2010, 03:37 AM   #18
Wayne Riddle
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The Conscientious Omnivore: Eggs

FWIW, I've been purchasing the Born Free brand at Wal-Mart. Cage Free, Omega-3 (DHA), Vitamin D, and Certified Humane, all for $2 a dozen.
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Old 11-15-2010, 08:50 AM   #19
Jarod Barker
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Originally Posted by Wayne Riddle View Post
The Conscientious Omnivore: Eggs

FWIW, I've been purchasing the Born Free brand at Wal-Mart. Cage Free, Omega-3 (DHA), Vitamin D, and Certified Humane, all for $2 a dozen.
Nice find, I'll have to make a trip to Walmart. I avoid that store like I avoid the dentist.... But if they have cage free eggs that cheap, I may need to bite the bullet.
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Old 01-10-2011, 07:38 PM   #20
Alex Gold
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Default Organic is not necessarily omega-3 optimal

Studies have repeatedly shown that conventional eggs have an omega-6: omega-3 ratio that is much higher than the 2:1 recommended by many Paleo sources. The ratio in conventional eggs is usually around 10:1 or higher. Omega-3 enriched eggs have been shown to have a better ratio, and an interesting recent study out of the University of Sydney found that omega-3 enriched eggs had a more optimal ratio than BOTH organic and conventional eggs. In fact, both the organic and conventional eggs each had a ratio of 10:1. The omega-3 enriched eggs had a ratio of 2.27:1.

That organic and conventional eggs have similar fatty acid ratios is not that surprising. Organic credentials don't really specify what the hens must be fed, but rather how they are treated and how the feed is treated (i.e. no herbicides, etc.). Since it is the hen feed that determines the fatty acid ratio of the egg (and the hen egg nutritional profile is actually quite remarkable in its sensitivity to hen dietary changes), then it is the makeup of the feed regardless of organic credentials that determines egg nutrients. Organically raised hens fed organic grain (i.e. an organic vegetarian diet) will be very organic indeed, but unlikely to have an omega-6: omega-3 ratio near 2:1.

The University of Sydney study is:
Samir Samman et al., “Fatty acid composition of certified organic, conventional and omega-3 eggs,” Food Chemistry 116, no. 4 (October 15, 2009): 911-914.

Please let me know if you would like further references.
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