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Old 08-23-2011, 05:20 AM   #11
Ola Persson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
I feel strongly that volume accumulation and frequency of practice are better strategies than relative intensity-based strategies for older lifters.
This certainly makes sense given how my body feels after a max rep set on squats.

Iīm thinking of switching to ladders on squat and deads but keep a linear progression on the pressing movements since they arenít as taxing and Iím still progressing?

(Iíll PM you a layout so I donít clutter this thread. If you have the time I would really appreciate some brief feedback.)
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Old 08-23-2011, 07:52 AM   #12
Steve Shafley
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I want to make things clear here:

I am not saying that intensity-based methods don't work. They do. I recommend young, new lifters to follow some sort of linear periodization scheme and try out all different kinds of exercises.

I am saying that for many, especially older lifters, or athletes from other sports, or folks with a lot of mileage on them, letting the volume do the work using an approach like this allows them to progress while feeling less beat up from the work.

I was recently told that the Icelandic deadlifters train in a similar fashion, and sneer at pulling maximal weights outside of competitions and mock competitions. They do their work, they keep their bar speed high, and they deadlift on Mondays to when they are freshest (Dave Van S. had some stuff on this recently)
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Old 08-23-2011, 07:56 AM   #13
Steve Shafley
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Here's what I had to say to Ola.

Originally Posted by Ola Persson
Quote:
Hi!

Thanks again for the valuable info on the forum! I would really appreciate it if you have the time to give me feedback on the following plan:
Monday: squat ladders 1-2-3, press/bench on a linear progression, other (mainly chins).
Wednesday: deadlift ladders 1-2-3, press/bench LP, other, conditioning.
Friday: squat ladders 1-2-3, press/bench LP, other (hamstring work/RDL),
Saturday: conditioning.

Basically something like the GSLP but with squat and dead ladders.

My background: 37 years, 110 kg, goals are to keep getting stronger (within a year press/Sq/DL 90/200/250 kg), loose 10 kg of body fat and gain some stamina. Current lifts: press 72,5 kg*9 reps, squat 167,5 kg*7, deadlift 200 kg*5 (Iíve only done close grip benches the last year due to shoulder issues). Been on Wendler and GSLP for 1Ĺ years.
Ola,

This looks fine for me.

If you review the Tuchsherer RPE chart that I have listed:

Quote:
10- Maximal. No reps left in the tank.
9- Last rep is tough, but still 1 rep left in the tank.
8- Weight is too heavy to maintain fast bar speed, but is not a struggle. 2-4 reps left.
7- Weight moves quickly when maximal force is applied to the weight. ďSpeed weightĒ
6- Light speed work. Moves quickly with moderate force.
5- Most warm-up weights
4- Recovery. Usually 20+ rep sets. Not hard, but intended to flush the muscle.
I would like your deadlift sets to be close to @9 on the triples. Squats should be closer to @8 to @8.5. You understand the non-linear kind of progression I am talking about here and how I would like you to control the volume based on how your workout feels that day?

Back to DLs:

So, if you do 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3...I would like that triple (at least the last one) to be @9...where you could do 1 more rep if you had to, because you are only deadlifting/pulling 1x weekly. BUT, it shouldn't be grinding and slow, it should come up quickly and be a well executed lift with regards to form and speed.

The problem seems to be this: (with regards to Wendler's 531 and to the GSPL): Some people don't get improvements in strength when they take a set close to failure (like in the last set for 531 or for GSLP), they get better muscular endurance (and hypertrophy) in that range. Contrary to popular belief, muscular endurance gains do not tend to bleed upwards, enhancing maximal strength gains ( this isn't universally true, however, but the converse: maximal strength gains positively impact muscular endurance gains is universally true)
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Old 08-23-2011, 01:29 PM   #14
Ola Persson
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As Chris said: I am very grateful for sharing your expertise and knowledge.

I'll digest this and adjust my workouts accordingly. I enjoy intensity based routines and have gotten stronger using them but this seems more suited for me and my life right now.
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Old 08-26-2011, 05:25 AM   #15
Steve Shafley
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There has been some sort of bizarre misunderstanding. I am not a doctor. Chris Wood's title of this thread seems to have misled at least one person.

Thanks.
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Old 08-26-2011, 06:19 AM   #16
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Sorry for the confusion, Steve. I wasn't trying to mislead anyone with the title. I still appreciate your input and advice.
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Old 08-27-2011, 09:06 AM   #17
Ola Persson
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A follow up question about assistance work, Steve. I have some hyperlordosis and can't engage my glutes and hamstrings fully. I'm doing assistance work to fix this and read the thread about GM vs RDL at IGX. Good stuff and I could relate to RDL:s not being optimal for me while GM:s seems to do the trick. There is a lot of different rep and weight schemes mentioned though and I can't sort out what to do?

Also, would leg curls be an option?
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Old 08-27-2011, 11:48 AM   #18
Steve Shafley
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How does the glute thrust feel? (if you don't know what that is, Brad Contreras is the one who really popularized it)

Will that work for you?
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