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Old 02-12-2013, 05:56 AM   #1
Eddie Paz
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Question Snatch v Power Snatch

Hi,

I am a beggining lifter who has been Olly lifting for 8 months now. I have been having a bit of trouble recently with my snatch, that sometimes afterwards I feel a twinge on my left shoulder.

Approaching my last contest I tweaked my shoulder a few times. It is never bad enough to stop me lifting. Anyway... I snatched 50kg and went to do 55kg. I had a brain fade and power snatched it. I then went to 56 determined to do the movement correctly and I got it, but in the process pulled my shoulder far worse than before. It didn't stop my from C&J but I took it easy (85kg). If that hadn't of been my last lift I wouldn't have snatched again.

Anyway my coach was away, and afterwards I got thinking about quitting snatch for a period of time, and power snatching (as I never hurt it power snatching). I hate snatching, I hate the OHS position, the only thing that has changed is my concern for my shoulder. I want to switch to power snatch for at least until my next meet, march 17. And I have to admit, I also think I will enjoy the sport more.

I ran this by the other coaches around the club and they thought it was a okay idea - but my main coach got back today and did not like the idea. He thinks the shoulder issue is due to my form, and since it doesn't come up at lighter weights, the solution is to scale back what I am doing and work on my form.

I can't argue with his logic, but I am concerned about doing some damage. I am 30 years old and aren't going to so anything career wise with my lifts... I'm just having fun training.

I was just wondering what people's thoughts were?
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:54 PM   #2
Greg Everett
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Do the snatch properly, don't just eliminate it. You can eliminate it and not experience a problem, but as soon as you re-introduce it, the problem will be back and you'll be no better off than you are now.

Identify the cause of the problem with your coach and come up w strategy to correct it. At the very least, overhead squat your power snatches after receiving them, and make sure you're still doing snatch balances and overhead squats to improve the bottom position and improve/maintain mobility.
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:19 PM   #3
Tamara Reynolds
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How old are you?

What are your goals in the sport this year? In 5 years? In your lifetime?
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:40 AM   #4
Eddie Paz
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I am 30

I lift to get strong. I compete because I enjoy it.

I don't really have a 5 year goal... Not getting injured? Keeping lifting after the marriage and babies 30 to 35 will bring

I am starting to think it is all in my shoulders and overhead squat... I have reread that part of the book. Am I holding the bar too far back?



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Old 02-27-2013, 07:37 PM   #5
Tamara Reynolds
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Does your shoulder hurt in those videos?

Have you seen a physician or physical therapist about the pain you're having?

Does it hurt during any exercises other than a full snatch or OHS?

Also, why don't you think that power snatching is "doing the movement correctly?"
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Old 03-03-2013, 05:11 AM   #6
Eddie Paz
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Hi Tamara,

- no it does not
- yes doctor, no to specialist
- no it does not, although once aggravated, OHP and chins will hurt it, though if it 'settled' they never will
- I am not sure i understand what you're asking

I understand how silly a thread is on an injury and i do appreciate the time that you have taken on my thread. I am/was discouraged by my incredible slow process on the snatch that doesn't seem to be doing anything but injuring me... But after a few days to think it over I am bit more optimistic, anyway my point is that I understand you're not going to be able to fix an injury through a forum, so I am happy to close this thread.

Thanks again for your time
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:11 PM   #7
David Gibbons
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Hi Eddie

I started doing the olympic lifts at 34, unfortunately self taught. I say unfortunately because it's harder to unlearn a bad technique then to learn a good technique from scratch. I found it much easier to power snatch everything, in fact I couldn't do a full snatch to start with (no idea how plus inadequate mobility) and it has taken a long time for me to stop reverting to power snatching when things get heavy (heavy being relative for me).

99.9% of my snatch misses are to the front, and there is a natural tendency to try to 'save' a lift. I too used to 'tweak' my shoulder doing this, at least once bad enough that I went to the physiotherapist about it. In my case it was a rotator cuff problem, although the pain was not in the back of the shoulder. This was fixed with some specific rotator cuff work, and as my mobility and technique have gradually improved I no longer have this problem.

Once your technique improves (and mobility, if that is a problem) you will find that your power snatch should be less than you could 'full' snatch. This took a long time for me! Perhaps I am a slow learner. Anyway, if you want to become a good snatcher than I agree don't give up on the 'full' snatch entirely.

Not sure if this helps you but it sounded kinda familiar so I thought I would drop in my 2c.

Cheers
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:25 AM   #8
Tamara Reynolds
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My point was that you can power snatch "correctly" or you can power snatch "incorrectly" just like you can with a full snatch. But, doing a power snatch instead of a full snatch doesn't automatically mean that you are doing the movement incorrectly.
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