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Old 06-18-2008, 04:09 PM   #1
Garrett Smith
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Default June Poliquin Question of Strength @ T-Nation

http://www.t-nation.com/article/most..._strength_june

Some highlights:

Quote:
For about 70% of the population who isn't carb tolerant, 2 grams per pound is good for mass gains. It can make a huge difference. Personally, I couldn't get above 192 pounds until bodybuilder Milos Sarcev convinced me to get 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight. In no time I was up to 205, lean.
...
It has to be individualized to an extent. Still, most people don't "deserve" the carbs they eat. The rule for most people is this: you have to earn your carbs.
Quote:
The overhead squat sucks for size gains. But as an assessment tool, it's unbeatable.

You can actually predict a player's risk of lower body injury playing his sport just by assessing how close to perfect form he can get with the overhead squat. Perfect form equals extremely low risk of injury, and research groups in Sweden and Switzerland have clearly demonstrated this in various studies. At the PICP (Poliquin International Certification Program) at level 3, we use it extensively in the prehab/rehab module.
...
Even Olympic lifters don't do the overhead squat anymore. People in the know stopped doing them in 1975. It's a forgotten exercise for training purposes...for good reasons.

The only reason people find them challenging is if they're not flexible. It's one of those exercises that looks cool but it's a total waste of time unless you're a novice Olympic lifter learning the ropes.
Quote:
Creatine is one of those things that works best the first time you use it.
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I still believe in the loading protocol.
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The advanced trainer should take a small dose (5 grams) of creatine pre-workout and a small dose post-workout.

By the way, most of the so-called "side effects" of creatine, like gut upset, were caused by using cheap forms of creatine that contained heavy metals.
..
Something else to keep in mind: Creatine has other functions besides increasing strength and size, like the prevention of brain aging and for the alkalization of the body. Good stuff.
As to how creatine is alkalizing to the body, being comprised of amino "acids", is a new one to me.

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A cleanse was a great idea... a hundred years ago. The reason is, the average American today has to detoxify 500 chemicals a day. So a cleanse was a better idea when there wasn't so much pollution around.

One phase of detoxification is in the liver and one phase is in the kidneys. This is known as phase 1 and phase 2 detoxification. You need rich nutrient reserves before you do any kind of detoxification program.

Most people don't have enough nutrients in their bodies, so as they detoxify they actually get very toxic! Since they're also consuming low calories on their cleanse, the fat cells dump the toxins as they burn them.

So, basically, people today get more toxic because of the cleanse. They have to get rid of all that stuff, so they actually get worse from the detox. It's easy to make yourself sick with a cleanse.

Finally, unless you have a genomic profile done, you should never do a cleanse. You need to know which enzymes you have. You also need to have a comprehensive metabolic profile done so you'll know what it is you need to detoxify. For example, if you have toxic levels of aluminum in your body, the only thing that pulls it out is magnesium malate.

You need to know what poison you have in your body so you'll know how to get rid of it. You can't do that with generic, unregulated, over-the-counter "detox" supplements.

In short, if you're going to do a cleanse, only do it under the supervision of a well-trained functional medicine doctor. Otherwise you could do something very bad for your health.
Preach on, brother!

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First, for fat loss purposes, I find aerobic training to be worthless. Most people are already stressed enough, and aerobic work only further stresses the adrenals.

Second, genetically speaking, we're made to throw a rock at a rabbit, not to run after it. We're not aerobically designed machines; we're designed for short bursts. Slow, continuous aerobic work also interferes with the brain's ability to recruit high-threshold motor units and interferes with power development.

I don't make any of my athletes do aerobic work unless they compete in an aerobic sport. And yet my athletes score really high on aerobic tests. My hockey players always have the highest VO2 max at camp, and all we do is interval training a few weeks out of camp. People can't believe my players don't do aerobic work in the summer.

In the '92 Olympics, the Canadian alpine ski team actually surpassed the cross-country team on aerobic scores using this method as measured by third party university labs.
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Listen, the research is very clear: Having a so-called aerobic base doesn't make you handle interval training any better. And most sports are basically interval training: short bursts followed by a rest, then another short burst.
Quote:
Soy is for dorks.

I really want to go to the Biosignature seminar, to better learn how to apply a lot of the knowledgez I've spent all this money and time accruing...
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Old 06-18-2008, 04:22 PM   #2
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Just read it, too. Still trying to get 180+ grams (1per lb and up) of protein a day. Time to up it still more, I guess.
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Old 06-18-2008, 05:34 PM   #3
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Read that earlier today. Great article.

The one gripe I have is with the protein per lbs. IMO 1g is enough unless you want to significantly add mass over what your body type normally will tolerate.. like packing it on BBer style.

For the rest of us 1g is fine.. less is fine as well if your training program and rest of your diet is good. I mean, I probably only get like .5g/lbs some days and I do fine. Shrug. Whatever though this is a pretty minor point.
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Old 06-18-2008, 06:08 PM   #4
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Not going to buy the whole aerobic thing is worthless for fat burning....as he deals with elite athletes already in elite conditioning (or maybe they had a month or two off). May work for them, but like I said...they were in top shape a month or two back...not like he took an average joe off the street and trained them for the NHL....but the typical overweight person will not do high enough intensity for intervals only to work, and will need extra aerobic based work after lifting to enhance fat burning. Best programming is something that can incorporate both without going into overtraining (aka what he talks about overstressing the adrenals...which I think you are fine unless you are talking about hours of cardio a day).

That being said intervals of course do well for athletes as most sports are explosive bouts of short term activity.

that and maybe Elmer Fudd should of used a rock.....
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Old 06-18-2008, 09:28 PM   #5
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I always find myself reading Poliquin and bouncing back and forth between "that's genius" and "really?".

I think Mike made good points that his take may be a bit biased. The longer, steady state cardio is crucial for your average obese, mainly sedentary person in order to help create a greater caloric deficit. I figure once work capacity has been improved through aerobic exercise and weight/fat loss, the intervals can be brought in.

I've been more wiped out from 2-3x weekly sprints than 2x 5k runs and I have played interval based sports all my life.

Another good point by Steven on the protein also. I often get the feeling that Poliquin seems to look at a lot of athlete type clients as novice bodybuilders. A certain amount of functional mass gain is crucial for power based sports, but how much can someone really put on and maintain their speed, agility, endurance etc.? I mean, how many great running backs would have been so so if they had 10-15 more lbs. on them? There's a fine line between increased athletic prowess and turning someone into an explosive behemoth who can't pull away anymore.
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Old 06-19-2008, 04:45 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Weaver View Post
I always find myself reading Poliquin and bouncing back and forth between "that's genius" and "really?".
Ditto that.

I would love to go to some of his seminars though. The Biosignature stuff seems really interesting.
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Old 06-19-2008, 07:42 AM   #7
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I'll never get 2g of protein a day, that's just too much work--then again, I'm not trying to gain muscle mass. Gymnastics is hard enough at 6' tall and 180#!!!

Also, working in a weight loss clinic, I see lots of overweight/obese people doing their "cardio" and not losing weight (especially if they don't get off all the carbs and artificial sweeteners). Steady-state low-intensity cardio should only be a stepping stone to higher levels of conditioning...once those are achieved, it becomes unnecessary and potentially counterproductive, IMO.

I do agree that he has a bodybuilding-ish bias in terms of the size of his athletes.

The overhead squat stuff is interesting. When I was designing my SS-inspired workouts, I thought about rotating it in, decided against it. If my front and back squats go up, the leg power will be there. The handstand/pressing training and other gymnastics strength work will help my overhead support and core strength, so that shouldn't be an issue. As far as any other coach who has see me is concerned, my OHS in OL shoes is fine. So, I left it out.

I will be trying out my OHS's for a max and BW reps soon, just to see if they have gone up. The OHS/FS/BS WOD from the other day will be a good one for a start...
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Old 06-19-2008, 08:11 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Weaver View Post
A certain amount of functional mass gain is crucial for power based sports, but how much can someone really put on and maintain their speed, agility, endurance etc.?
Agreed....although I would say it depends on the position and sport...linemen vs running backs. But true story, knew a NHL guy who put on 30lbs over the summer of muscle doing hard style BB based hypertrophy workouts with loads of pasta.......looked huge.....but come training camp he was winded and worthless and they had to widdle down 20lbs off him to get him to be functional for 3 periods. Coaches were not too happy. More is not always better.....it helps but there will always be a point of diminishing returns. A 195lb hockey player will be faster than perhaps a 235lb hockey play in open ice....but I'm guessing the 235lb player wins the battles in the corners. Each has a role....I guess that what makes sports interesting as you can see people's strengths and weaknesses exposed. But pros are usually experts at a few things (speed, power, strength) and never a master of all things....hence why there is a full team behind them to play roles. The sports person trying to be good at everything without mastering 1-2 things, will spend all of their time in the minors.
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Old 06-19-2008, 08:14 AM   #9
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2 g/lb?!? I maintain 185 lbs at 10% BF with an average of 145 g/day (according to FitDay).
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Old 06-19-2008, 08:23 AM   #10
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I could use a few pounds. Time for a bucket of powder and LOTS of scrapjacks.
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