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Old 07-22-2008, 05:40 AM   #1
Craig Snyder
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Default C&J Critique

This video was taken the same day as the snatch vid that I posted. 80% of max.

I will be changing the bar position to over the base of my toes and trying to get more upright as was recommened in the snatch vid. But there is also something funny going on when I jerk, kind of a hip circle at the bottom of the dip. Am I just pushing my butt back instead of dropping straight down? Or what else is causing that?


http://youtube.com/watch?v=Q0D-rY9GR3g

Thanks,
Craig
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Old 07-22-2008, 09:38 AM   #2
Danny John
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Some basic stuff:

You seem to have some flexibility issues. I would suggest dropping into the full squat every time you clean for a while. Note as you catch, it seems that your hips "catch," too.

Drive your head through the jerk so the arms are "behind the years.

I have to say this, too: you need to go heavier on the critiqued videos. Your slow second pull might simply be "not enough weight on the bar." I like to look at video of my big lifts, otherwise, you can cheat like hell. If you ever seen the BFS "Power Clean" video, I did 250 in the snatch and I think 315 in the clean for ten reps so they could get all the angles. They aren't worth watching because the weights are light and I just snapped them up rather than having to really load up the hips and hammies.

It's a point that I make with a lot of guys here on this forum. I remember a guy with an 85 pound snatch when I showed up and double that when I left...
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Old 07-22-2008, 10:02 AM   #3
Allen Yeh
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I wonder who that could be?

Thanks again, planning on being in DC anytime soon? I owe you at least one beer if not several.
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Old 07-22-2008, 12:14 PM   #4
Danny John
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Yes, I thought you might have caught that subtle reference! I had a chance to be in DC last month, but I can only do so much. I have gone there three or four times since TestFest, but it was all gov't work, so I don't talk about it before I leave and, really, I go from hotel to work to hotel to work to hotel...

You get the point.

I really enjoyed our day, by the way...
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Old 07-22-2008, 01:10 PM   #5
David Stout
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Originally Posted by Danny John View Post
Yes, I thought you might have caught that subtle reference! I had a chance to be in DC last month, but I can only do so much. I have gone there three or four times since TestFest, but it was all gov't work, so I don't talk about it before I leave and, really, I go from hotel to work to hotel to work to hotel...

You get the point.

I really enjoyed our day, by the way...
DJ -

Do you post up your seminar schedule anywhere?
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Old 07-22-2008, 01:23 PM   #6
Craig Snyder
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I've always had problems with flexibility and have had to work my ass off for every degree of motion that I get.

I will take your advice and the next time I post vids, I will post my max attempts. More than likely, the end of this cycle after I have had time to work on some of the things that Greg, you and Sarena have indicated.

Thanks,
Craig
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Old 07-22-2008, 03:34 PM   #7
Greg Everett
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Clean -

1. Same deal RE start position mentioned for the snatch

2. Don't rip it off the floor. squeeze it off and then accelerate. that jerk does your body no favors, and it will invariably throw off your weight balance, etc.

3. You're leading with your hips when you pull - notice how your ass shoots up and your shoulders stay behind, getting you nearly straight-knees with little bar movement. If you start how I'vesuggested, you'll get a very slight shift in back angle, ie the hips will rise ahead of teh shoulders, in the first couple inches of bar movement, but after that, you want to keep your back angle constant until you initiate the 2nd pull.

4. Stop looking like Jaquin Pheonix - remember that turning the elbows out is not the same thing as protracting the shoulder blades. during the 1st pull and most of teh 2nd, you want your shoulder blades held in a neutral position. once you peak at the 2nd and initiate the 3rd pull, you'll retract.

5. Get your elbows around ALL the way right away. You get a bit hooked up near the end of the turn over and then adjust. deliver the bar to your shoulders and let it rest on them fully right away. the hands are just along for the ride once it's racked.

7. Ride it all the way into a full squat - by full, i mean full. not breaking parallel. ass to ankles. once you start hitting bigger weights, there's no way you'll be stopping where you are, so get used to a full squat and catching the bounce out of the bottom to recover.

8. all in all, a good clean.


jerk -

1. Get a jerk rack - don't use your clean rack. jerking from the finger tips is a last option for those limited by flexibility. Without moving your protracted shoulders, sink your hands in as deep as you can (with a loose grip) and drop your elbows, at the most to just short of vertical. In other words, you have to have the bar racked securely on the shoulders, but you also want to get yourself positioned for good pressing mechanics.

2. Get your breath and set before you initiate the dip. breathing in on the way down is a sure way to be inconsistent and less than stable.

3. Notice at the bottom of your dip how your knees and hips slide forward. I take that as an indication that your dip is too deep. Shorten it up a bit and stay tight to prevent that sliding.

4. #3 leads to #4 - you want your back foot to land a split second before your front. you hit front first, most likely because you're weight is shifting forward during the drive bc of that forward slide, although you do compensate for it pretty well during the drive. Drive THE SHIT out of the bar, and make sure you finish that drive before you start heading down. It also may help to think of pushing the front heel forward when you split - that may get your leg up and out a little better and give you that extra time and distance to get to the needed receiving depth.

5. Like Dan said, the overhead position needs work. Rack the bar across your back for a back squat and press it straight up without moving your torso - that's where you should be, i.e. slight forward torso lean, shoulder blades retracted and elevated tightly, bar over the back base of your neck, head pushed through the arms.
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Old 07-23-2008, 11:30 AM   #8
Craig Snyder
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Thanks for taking time for that reply.

One question about the ass to grass squat, should I worry about my low back rounding down there or just do it and try to fix it as I go? That is the main reason that I don't go all the way down.

Craig
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Old 07-23-2008, 11:36 AM   #9
Ben Moskowitz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Everett View Post
7. Ride it all the way into a full squat - by full, i mean full. not breaking parallel. ass to ankles. once you start hitting bigger weights, there's no way you'll be stopping where you are, so get used to a full squat and catching the bounce out of the bottom to recover.
Is it better to ride into a full squat without the requisite flexibility (pelvis rounding), or only to the point of a tight lower back?
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Old 07-23-2008, 01:36 PM   #10
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RE lower back - be careful right now, but go all the way down with your ligher weights - consider that flexibility work. Most importantly, get more flexible fast! work you ankle flexibility too.
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