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Old 08-23-2008, 09:54 AM   #1
Brandon Enos
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 171
Default Ugh...

Okay, forward. Asked the original question on crossfit first, most of my answers involved running form, shoes, or the instrusctions to just do the WOD and not worry about running, in other words, not answering the question...so heres an updated version of it.

As some of you know from previous postings of mine, Im preparing for a sheriff academy in January/February where running is a big thing. Well now that school is starting and my schedule is being changed around, I have more time to devote to working out, so Im trying to work on a new schedule.

So basically I thought of this, keep my running on Tue, Thur, Sat (rotating between sprint work and endurance work days) and leave Mon, Wed, Fri for resistance work.

So here's the problem. About everyother Thur night-Monday afternoon (basically right after one class and right before another) Im going to be about 400 miles away visiting my girlfriend. For this reason I wont have access to anything other than my bodyweight. For this reason I was thinking of doing metcon type resistance work on Mon and Fridays, using barbells, sandbags, KBs, etc while home (take the train down and they have a weight limit, so they have to stay home) and bodyweight metcons while down there. So then for Wednesday, strength based only, focusing on the olympic lifts. My other thought for Wednesday, nothing. Maybe a walk with the dog, and thats it. Of course that will depend on the answer to this question. Even though they arent heavy and not strength focused, will short and intense resistance based metcons help preserve lbm? That would be kind of nice because my strength goals are just maintance (sp?) and it would only be 5 days a week, but even if I need to do six, no workout will go over an hour, and most not over half, so that shouldnt be to hard to handle for about 4 months.

My only other thought that I like would be to do a schedule like the CAWODs, 3-on, 1-off, 2-on, 1-off. Only one problem with that though, no idea how to set it up. I want to run at least 3 days a week (rotating between the sprint and endurance days). I dont really care if they are part of a double workout or by themselves. As for the strength workouts, no intent on building size or strength really. Im trying to lose overall size (not lbm though) and maintain strength. Im already strong enough to pass all the strength based tests, so since my goals are to lose weight and get used to running, Im putting strength on the back burner for now (only strength related goal I currently have is to increase my pullup numbers), which is why it would be great news to find out that resistance based metcons prevent lbm loss, especially since I know they help trigger fat loss.

Any thoughts and oppinions will be appreciated. Sorry if it seems a little clustered and chaotic, I think a big reason for typing this aside from getting some advice was to get it out of my head and into an area where I could see it and think about it a little more clearly.

Thanks
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Old 08-23-2008, 10:04 AM   #2
Brandon Enos
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Location: California
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Default

Quick follow up, mainly for 2nd scenario, forgot to add in this question. In the CAWOD FAQ, for metcon, it says it breaks it up into medium-heavy-light. Is that possible to transfer over to running and how would that work?

Here's a list from undergroundstrengthcoach.com forums; how would you classify these for example:
- hills
- stairs
- 1.5 - 3 mile runs
- sprints (100m sprints, etc)
- trail running

Im a little confused. At first I wanted to classify the 1.5-3 miles as heavy bc of distance, but its done at a much slower, less taxing speed than say the sprints, so Im not sure what makes something heavy versus light.
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Old 08-24-2008, 12:49 AM   #3
Steven Low
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What is the test (actual events) that you're trying to get through?

This is going to dictate your training (if you are indeed training for that) more than what you think is going to dictate your training (depending on your actual abilities and how soon you need to reach certain criteria).

Otherwise, the rest is (losing fat) is mainly going to be up to diet. 6/1 is not a good schedule either unless you have some very light days (which you don't because of sprints.. and resistance training). 3/1/2/1 or something based on your travel schedule is most likely the best.
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Old 08-24-2008, 03:10 AM   #4
Jay Cohen
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Location: Western Pa
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Default

B;

Quit over thinking this. You've been around along enough to figure out how to mix up different modalities to achieve your goals.

Ask 10 people, you're going to get 10 different answers. Set your goal, then set your program and get on it.

Tweak as needed.
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Old 08-24-2008, 06:13 AM   #5
Alex Europa
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Location: Oahu, Hawaii
Posts: 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Enos View Post
Quick follow up, mainly for 2nd scenario, forgot to add in this question. In the CAWOD FAQ, for metcon, it says it breaks it up into medium-heavy-light. Is that possible to transfer over to running and how would that work?

Here's a list from undergroundstrengthcoach.com forums; how would you classify these for example:
- hills
- stairs
- 1.5 - 3 mile runs
- sprints (100m sprints, etc)
- trail running

Im a little confused. At first I wanted to classify the 1.5-3 miles as heavy bc of distance, but its done at a much slower, less taxing speed than say the sprints, so Im not sure what makes something heavy versus light.
With running, a good way to determine how "hard" a workout was is to assign values for distance and intensity. For example, if you go on a 3 mile run (NOT alot of distance) and just jog at a comfortable "talking" pace then you could assign a value of like 3 for each, totalling 6. However, if it was an intervals workout running 6 x 400 w/ 400 recoveries. You might assign a value of 3 for distance but 7 or 8 for intensity (10/11). There's nothing really scientific to this, just a subjective judgement based on your training past and how you felt during the workout.

One of the biggest problems with running is that very few people take truly easy days. Everyone thinks that they are better runners than they really are, so they might "jog" at 8:45 mpm when they should be running at 9:15 or 9:30.

I know everyone around here is interval based, but there is definitely some merit to doing some distance work (60-75 minutes) once per week. You'll get some adaptations that you won't get doing anything else.

For your schedule, you could try something like:
Mon: Off
Tues: (am) 15-30 min. Light jog; (pm) ME or Heavy Metcon
Wed: Intervals
Thurs: Off
Fri: (am) 15-30 min. Light Jog; (pm) BW Metcon/Ring sequence
Sat: BW Metcon
Sun: Long Run

I chose those days as off days since I doubt you'll be able to consistantly find the time to workout with all the travelling.

And there's got to be a way that you can take a KB with you to your girlfriends (or better yet, buy one and have it shipped there!). That would add more variety to your workouts while you're there. Also, what about rings? If you don't have them, get them!

- Alex
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Old 08-24-2008, 09:20 AM   #6
Brandon Enos
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
What is the test (actual events) that you're trying to get through?

This is going to dictate your training (if you are indeed training for that) more than what you think is going to dictate your training (depending on your actual abilities and how soon you need to reach certain criteria).

Otherwise, the rest is (losing fat) is mainly going to be up to diet. 6/1 is not a good schedule either unless you have some very light days (which you don't because of sprints.. and resistance training). 3/1/2/1 or something based on your travel schedule is most likely the best.
The test minimum is a 99-yard obstacle course, pretty easy except one part where movement gets kind of tight. 165 dummy drag, 32 feet; easiest part for me. 6' solid wall and 6' chain link fence climbs. And 500 yard run.

I already passed it once to stay in the hiring process, but Ill have to do it again at a faster pace to pass the academy. For them though, running is a big thing, the first thing they have people do is a 5 mile hill run on the first day to get people to quit. I was told that at least once a day they run you up a hill to a flat spot with a bunch of rocks and have you run around with those, perform pushups, etc.
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Old 08-24-2008, 09:21 AM   #7
Brandon Enos
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Cohen View Post
B;

Quit over thinking this. You've been around along enough to figure out how to mix up different modalities to achieve your goals.

Ask 10 people, you're going to get 10 different answers. Set your goal, then set your program and get on it.

Tweak as needed.
Your right, I do tend to over think just about everything, and exercise is no exception.
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Old 08-24-2008, 09:31 AM   #8
Brandon Enos
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Europa View Post
With running, a good way to determine how "hard" a workout was is to assign values for distance and intensity. For example, if you go on a 3 mile run (NOT alot of distance) and just jog at a comfortable "talking" pace then you could assign a value of like 3 for each, totalling 6. However, if it was an intervals workout running 6 x 400 w/ 400 recoveries. You might assign a value of 3 for distance but 7 or 8 for intensity (10/11). There's nothing really scientific to this, just a subjective judgement based on your training past and how you felt during the workout.

One of the biggest problems with running is that very few people take truly easy days. Everyone thinks that they are better runners than they really are, so they might "jog" at 8:45 mpm when they should be running at 9:15 or 9:30.

I know everyone around here is interval based, but there is definitely some merit to doing some distance work (60-75 minutes) once per week. You'll get some adaptations that you won't get doing anything else.

For your schedule, you could try something like:
Mon: Off
Tues: (am) 15-30 min. Light jog; (pm) ME or Heavy Metcon
Wed: Intervals
Thurs: Off
Fri: (am) 15-30 min. Light Jog; (pm) BW Metcon/Ring sequence
Sat: BW Metcon
Sun: Long Run

I chose those days as off days since I doubt you'll be able to consistantly find the time to workout with all the travelling.

And there's got to be a way that you can take a KB with you to your girlfriends (or better yet, buy one and have it shipped there!). That would add more variety to your workouts while you're there. Also, what about rings? If you don't have them, get them!

- Alex
Im actually pretty lucky in that my girlfriend is currently working out everyday since she plans to join the air force at the end of the semester, so that makes it easier to get out there and do it.

Shipping it may be the only option. Gas is to high to drive down there in my truck, so I have to use the train, and they have a 100 pound carry on limit. And of course, lucky me, the Antioch station, the closest one to me until they build one here one day, is a ghetto looking place, concret platform and a couple benches. There, you just get on the train and buy your ticket after the train has departed, so checked lugguage definately isnt an option. I was thinking however, look at the parks near her house and see if any of them have any good sized rocks I can throw around. And I already have rings, two sets, and love them.
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Old 08-25-2008, 04:10 AM   #9
Alex Europa
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Location: Oahu, Hawaii
Posts: 27
Default

So there you go, take a KB and some rings down there and you'll be able to make up some solid workouts. If you can find some big rocks to put overhead and carry around, all the better.

But you know, I have to play devil's advocate here. It really sounds like standard CrossFit programming would do a good job of getting you prepared for the academy. Especially considering the fact that they will probably have a heavy empahisis on endurance (despite it's lack of application to the LEO field), and a decent amount of running built in.

Just out of curiosity, is there a reason you don't want to work off the main page? Have you considered the USTactical WODs? They would be a good fit to prepare you for the academy as well.

Good luck!
- Alex
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Old 08-25-2008, 06:32 AM   #10
Brandon Enos
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Europa View Post
So there you go, take a KB and some rings down there and you'll be able to make up some solid workouts. If you can find some big rocks to put overhead and carry around, all the better.

But you know, I have to play devil's advocate here. It really sounds like standard CrossFit programming would do a good job of getting you prepared for the academy. Especially considering the fact that they will probably have a heavy empahisis on endurance (despite it's lack of application to the LEO field), and a decent amount of running built in.

Just out of curiosity, is there a reason you don't want to work off the main page? Have you considered the USTactical WODs? They would be a good fit to prepare you for the academy as well.

Good luck!
- Alex
Two main reasons. The first is that I want more running in my program than the you would usually get from the WOD. Second is with travel and everything, its going to be hard to hit the WOD all the due to lack of equipment. Sure, substitution is always an option, but if your going to end up substituting anyways, might as well just plan ahead and set your schedule up to be as little impacted by travel as possible, imo.
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