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Old 04-04-2010, 11:09 PM   #1
Jay Guindon
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Default Bench Press vs Weighted Push Up

Hey guys,
Would a weighted pushup or bench press be a better exercise for pushing strength in the real world? I work in a warehouse and had to push a few boxes of Cliff Bars to the back of a shelf today and wish I had a little better pushing strength.
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Old 04-05-2010, 04:50 AM   #2
Paul LaDuke
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Probably the push ups because that involves the stabilizing muscles of the posterior shoulder much more. Plus there is a core stabilizing aspect of pushups that is non-existent in the bench press.

Additionally, you may want to think about the leg involvement in pushing boxes. Pushing a sled may even yield better results.
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Old 04-06-2010, 03:00 AM   #3
Blair Lowe
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Bench Press.

It's not to say that you should leave out pushups to stabilize the shoulder but for raw strength- weighted press.

Overhead pressing still needs to involve the trunk. I think I have read something about how if the feet are planted on the ground in a BP, the trunk is involved.

The sled pushing is a good idea. I used to get a hell of a workout pushing about 9 crates of milk in the dairy freezer. It's fluid but that is an assload of fluid. That's
4608 ounces of milk besides the crates (which are almost nothing). I used to call it 290 pounds. Fun to push.
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:28 AM   #4
Júlíus G. Magnússon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul LaDuke View Post
Probably the push ups because that involves the stabilizing muscles of the posterior shoulder much more. Plus there is a core stabilizing aspect of pushups that is non-existent in the bench press.

Additionally, you may want to think about the leg involvement in pushing boxes. Pushing a sled may even yield better results.
I'm afraid you don't know how to bench press.
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:32 AM   #5
Gant Grimes
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Bench press for about a googol reasons. Weighted pushups are stupid, and loading is difficult to impossible at heavier weights. If you want to do pushup progressions, fine. But let's not crossfit this thread up with ideas about functional pressing and silly progressions.

You should bench 225# at the minimum, at which point you'll have no more trouble from candy bars.
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:39 AM
Mike ODonnell
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Old 04-06-2010, 09:36 AM   #6
Geoffrey Thompson
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If your bench press is like 70kg, then, yeah, weighted pushups and the bench press will probably both help you out (squats will also help you out at that point, you're bloody weak). If your bench press is 140kg, then weighted pushups just cannot provide the same stimulus as the bench press because you cannot get remotely close in weight. I think doing some weighted pushup work may be good for scapular health and all that trendy functional jazz at that point because I recently read an article on EliteFTS from a 600# raw bencher who loves them (who am I to argue?), but, for strength, it's all about the bench press. And overhead press, that's handy, too. With a 200# overhead press, you'll have all the functional strength you'll need for most jobs.
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Old 04-06-2010, 09:42 AM   #7
Geoffrey Thompson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul LaDuke View Post
Probably the push ups because that involves the stabilizing muscles of the posterior shoulder much more. Plus there is a core stabilizing aspect of pushups that is non-existent in the bench press.
Do a heavy one-armed bench press - only hand carries a load, don't have bells in both hands - and report back. It's a different type of core stabilization in the bench, but it's not absent. Ignore if your bench press isn't much more than bodyweight.
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Old 04-06-2010, 07:49 PM   #8
Paul LaDuke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Júlíus G. Magnússon View Post
I'm afraid you don't know how to bench press.
Really? I write 53 words and you can come to the conclusion that I don't know how to bench press? HMMM. What else can't I do? I am learning a lot from your vast wisdom.
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:08 PM   #9
Dave Van Skike
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Originally Posted by Paul LaDuke View Post
Really? I write 53 words and you can come to the conclusion that I don't know how to bench press? HMMM. What else can't I do? I am learning a lot from your vast wisdom.
I'd suggest that he's about right. if you've seen it done properly, you'd understand. despite the fact I hate the bench, when done heavy it really is a full body lift. when you pair it with heavy overhead pressing it is untouched in it's abilty to build upper body strength including wrist, forearm and upper back. benching 100k is may be NBD for you, but once you can lock out 150-200k you'll have no questions about the superiority of the bench.

and this is from an avowed hater of the bench, the incline and all versions of seated pressing. in summary, i find them awful, but very very effective. they just work. the "functional diatribe is a waste of brain cells but if you want to talk carryover between one kind of lift to another, i've never seen a big bencher who wasn't also pretty decent at lifting atlas stones, pressing logs and rope pulling.

pushups with chains on your back or ring pushups are cool too, but not the same.
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:30 PM   #10
Jay Guindon
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I seem to be very confused about functional fitness. I understood it to be movements that are found in nature...shoulder press being pushing something overhead, say to get it onto a shelf, muscle up being the way I would get myself onto some scaffolding. I have heard some people say that it is possible to do exercises that don't resemble everyday movements, say back levers (unless you're a gymnast I don't find many people need to do them for any function in daily life) and yet greatly increase their ability to do everyday tasks. Can someone explain this to me?

Secondly, how does one balance getting strong via weightlifting and keeping the ability to easily move their body through space? For example, I don't want to lose my ability to muscle up on straight bars as it is actually something I use almost on a daily basis in the warehouse where I work to get from one level to another or onto the really high shelving. Rope climbing is the same thing. Well I climb shelving supports actually, but I often find myself scaling up the supports using just my hands the same way someone would climg a rope without using their feet.
I would also like to increase my ability to move external loads, such as the 100lb bags of silica sand, to something that is easy for me instead of a challenge. It seems for that I would need some solid weight training.
Can I just combine something like starting strength with regular muscle up/rope climbing training? Should I ever add weight to muscle ups and rope climbing as it's getting easier?
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