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Old 04-27-2010, 05:50 PM   #1
Chris Tracy
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Location: San Jose, CA
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Default Low back rehab/assistance exercises

I'm coming back from an illness that knocked the tar out of me, lost nearly 30 lbs over a few months. I'm feeling good and have been slowly trying to regain lost strength and strained my low back doing DL's with what would normally be really light weight for sets of 5. I strained it yesterday and it felt surprisingly good this morning. I've been icing and know this isn't a serious injury.

My first question is... what should I sub for squats (front & back) and DL's for the next couple of weeks? I was thinking some single leg work and maybe work on machines... only thing I don't have access to is a reverse hyper.

Second question is... my core is obviously the weakest link right. I'm alternating TGU's and windmills at the end of my workouts to address some of my issues, should I also add a low back assistance exercise? I didn't add any low back in because I felt it couldn't handle the extra work, I obviously need to rethink things. Does my programming include too much back work? It was feeling fine until one bad rep, wasn't feeling over worked. Not the right kind of back work? Should I add some simple stuff in that I could do at home on my rest days?

I'm doing a modified SS rotating the following workouts:

Workout A
Squat
Press
DL
Pull-ups
TGU's

Workout B
Front Squat
Bench
RDL's
DB Rows
Windmills

Workout C
Squat
Push press/jerk
Power Cleans/Clean pulls from the floor
Pull-ups
TGU's

Thanks in advance!
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Old 04-27-2010, 06:18 PM   #2
Gavin Harrison
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If you want to deload the spine, you could do hip belt squats. For your lower back, if it was me, I'd probably do lots of back/hip extensions or 45 degree back/hip extensions, and if possible reverse hypers, also abs. Since it's not a bad injury, I'd just move my squat and deadlift light and work up slowly.
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Old 04-27-2010, 08:44 PM   #3
Steven Low
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This may help:
http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2010/0...uscle-strains/

Reverse hypers are good
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Old 04-28-2010, 05:14 AM   #4
Allen Yeh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Tracy View Post

My first question is... what should I sub for squats (front & back) and DL's for the next couple of weeks? I was thinking some single leg work and maybe work on machines... only thing I don't have access to is a reverse hyper.
Nothing wrong with single leg stuff for a few weeks, maybe really light sets of squats and DL's during your warmup for reps and then single leg stuff for your work sets.
For an expansion of glute stuff checkout this article:
http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_a...the_glute_myth

Glute Stuff
FS - warmup
rear leg elevated split squat (bulgarian split squat) - This will suck no matter what rep/set scheme you choose
GM - sets of 15

Glute stuff
DL - warmup
single leg RDL
back extensions (without hyperextending)


Quote:
Second question is... my core is obviously the weakest link right. I'm alternating TGU's and windmills at the end of my workouts to address some of my issues, should I also add a low back assistance exercise? I didn't add any low back in because I felt it couldn't handle the extra work, I obviously need to rethink things. Does my programming include too much back work? It was feeling fine until one bad rep, wasn't feeling over worked. Not the right kind of back work? Should I add some simple stuff in that I could do at home on my rest days?
Not necessarily and it's hard to say what the problem is or isn't without seeing your lift and without a better description of the pain/problem. Could be you that you hyper extend your back when you DL instead of pushing through with your hips . http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_a...adlift_part_ii
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:04 AM   #5
Mark Fenner
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I am not a doctor. I am not a doctor. I am not a doctor.

However, my sports doctor always told me something along the lines of: (assuming you are healthy enough to do the activity at all) if you don't do the activity that is in question, how will you know if you are improving that activity?

In this case, if DLs are the issue, there is no way to know whether any rehab/healing is helping your DL issues, unless you do the DL. Now, this doesn't mean 1RMs! A reasonable recommendation is 50% intensity and you might go substantially less (for example, you said you tweaked your back on a "very light" weight ... you might go 50% of that very light weight). Build backup very gradually.

All the glute, 1-leg, etc. advice is very good. Blood flow is good. Don't underestimate the power of, say, bodyweight only good mornings, 1-leg RDLs, etc. Beware of doing too much volume as fatigue is a large factor in back injuries. I would be so bold as to say that your very light deadlift might have been the acute factor but that cumulative stress was the real culprit.

It is completely a matter of your own judgement, but a one day strain that feels good the next day is not always a reason to take off 3-4 weeks of (regularly scheduled) training. However, being prudent for the next several workouts makes a lot of sense.

As far as your programming goes, the amount of weight you are using and your training history will make a big difference in whether it is "too much" (back work) or not.

Best,
Mark
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