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Old 08-26-2010, 06:41 PM   #1
Troy Kerr
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Default To fat to squat?

When working with at my affiliate we also have a program run through a community college that allows public safety members ( police, radio dispatchers, etc..) to come in an obtain college credit for working out. When trying to teach some of the morbidly obese group members to squat, it seems that they can only get but so low. I know part of it is that they probably are being made to go, but I can't help but wonder if at some point someone can possibly get to fat to safely and effectively squat?
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Old 08-26-2010, 08:16 PM   #2
Donald Lee
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If somebody's that obese, I'm not sure squatting is important to that person at all. They probably have plenty of mobility, flexibility, stability, and other neural/structural issues. It's hard enough teaching normal folks how to squat properly.

I'd rather do something like lunges for the obese.
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Old 08-27-2010, 12:06 AM   #3
Derek Weaver
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Split squats for the win. Or lunges, like Donald said.
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Old 08-27-2010, 03:28 AM   #4
Darryl Shaw
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If they're morbidly obese I wouldn't be too concerned with their squat, I'd just have them work on general mobility and improving their base fitness level until they've lost some weight.
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Old 08-28-2010, 04:08 PM   #5
Harry Munro
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I think it's very important to teach the very obese how to squat. There is no need to add weight to the movement but getting them bodyweight squatting will aid simple acts like standing up from a chair. It's the movement that is the important thing.
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Old 10-04-2010, 04:42 PM   #6
Christine Petty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald Lee View Post
If somebody's that obese, I'm not sure squatting is important to that person at all. They probably have plenty of mobility, flexibility, stability, and other neural/structural issues. It's hard enough teaching normal folks how to squat properly.

I'd rather do something like lunges for the obese.

I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with this. A lunge for someone that heavy is a terrible and possibly knee destroying idea.

Squatting with no weight is a better option, and depth will come in time.
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Old 10-05-2010, 04:08 AM   #7
James Evans
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Originally Posted by Christine Petty View Post
I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with this. A lunge for someone that heavy is a terrible and possibly knee destroying idea.

Squatting with no weight is a better option, and depth will come in time.
I'm with Christine here.

Consider how many relatively 'healthy' athletes struggle with instability in a lunge.

Reverse lunges offer a safer alternative, I tend to see much more control in the movement but I would still hold back on these.
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Old 10-05-2010, 04:32 AM   #8
Donald Lee
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Yeah, I'm not a big fan of forward lunges. I guess I should have clarified. I would start with a split squat or squat lunge or whatever you want to call it. Then, maybe someday progress to a reverse lunge. Squatting to a high box would not be a bad idea though.
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Old 10-05-2010, 04:39 AM   #9
James Evans
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A controlled box squat would be good, particularly as we have reached the point of evolution where we need to facilitate the act of sitting down and standing up - see Harry's post above. Although I'm partly joking look at how many people collapse into a chair or use their arms to lever themselves back up.

Maybe if we all rediscovered the lost human skill of walking we might be on the way to not having to do some of this nonsense in the gym.
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Old 10-05-2010, 12:37 PM   #10
Gant Grimes
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I wouldn't do any sort of lunges with obese people--forward or reverse. Too many balance issues for little reward (at this time).

Squats can also be a problem as there are likely a lot of balance and proprioceptive issues that will limit what you can do. The heaviest guy I worked with was over 500 pounds. I had him do planks/side planks, wall presses (press yourself away from the wall), stripper squats, and getups (go from the floor to a standing position).

The stripper squats were done holding onto a power rack. Don't go for full depth immediately, as the knee has not been subjected to that much weight in awhile. Start with partials and work your way down.
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