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Old 09-18-2011, 07:48 PM   #1
Bee Brian
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Default How do you develop "pulling speed?"

I've watched this video several times:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXZt4PhdUns



I have seen power cleans (including mine) with the same bar path as the way Dimas does it, but the speed during second and third pull is insane...

Is it a technique issue or is it a physical attribute?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 09-19-2011, 11:16 AM   #2
Spencer Mackay
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All of the above.
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Old 09-23-2011, 10:52 PM   #3
Ricardo Costa
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Like Al Davis, I love speed, if you have speed/explosiveness it can trump a lot of things!
If you don't have it though, you can develop speed off the floor. Incorporate Speed pulls (West Side Style) pulling against bands, pulling with chains added, pulling standing on blocks, Reverse Band pulls/cleans, and just focusing on exercises that utilize explosive starting strength. When I was around more Oly Lifters i always pushed violent explosion, you'll never break through those sticking points if you do it slow and no intensity. Good luck on your quest for speed.

~Costa~
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Old 09-24-2011, 09:48 AM   #4
Greg Everett
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Speed is definitely a natural attribute; that is, some people have more than others, training notwithstanding. That being said, anyone can improve speed through training, but it's like most other physical characteristics like strength, mass, etc in that there are definitely genetic ceilings on development.

Technique can certainly improve speed, though. Ideal technique in the Olympic lifts will set up the lifter to be in the optimal positions for accelerating a bar. The simplest example by way of illustration is proximity of the bar and body - if you try to lift a bar that's 3 inches away from you, it will move more slowly that if the bar is in immediate proximity. You didn't get any faster, you just set yourself up to be able to move faster.

Timing at the top of the lifts will also contribute to overall speed of the lifts, but also to the appearance of speed. That is, often what makes a snatch or clean (or even jerk) appear so explosive is not the speed of the athlete extending upward to lift the bar, but the speed at which that athlete snaps up and then back down under the bar. I think this element of the lifts is influenced more by technique than natural ability, whereas the speed of extension has a much larger genetic ability component.
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Old 09-24-2011, 04:10 PM   #5
Bee Brian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Everett View Post
Speed is definitely a natural attribute; that is, some people have more than others, training notwithstanding. That being said, anyone can improve speed through training, but it's like most other physical characteristics like strength, mass, etc in that there are definitely genetic ceilings on development.

Technique can certainly improve speed, though. Ideal technique in the Olympic lifts will set up the lifter to be in the optimal positions for accelerating a bar. The simplest example by way of illustration is proximity of the bar and body - if you try to lift a bar that's 3 inches away from you, it will move more slowly that if the bar is in immediate proximity. You didn't get any faster, you just set yourself up to be able to move faster.

Timing at the top of the lifts will also contribute to overall speed of the lifts, but also to the appearance of speed. That is, often what makes a snatch or clean (or even jerk) appear so explosive is not the speed of the athlete extending upward to lift the bar, but the speed at which that athlete snaps up and then back down under the bar. I think this element of the lifts is influenced more by technique than natural ability, whereas the speed of extension has a much larger genetic ability component.


Sounds very accurate. Thanks!
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Old 09-24-2011, 04:37 PM   #6
Tyson Wright
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I have a very bad habit of hanging out at the top. The other day I focused more on aggressive snapping hips up and down vs my typical focus on "finishing" where I feel I end up hanging out with my ankles extended. Helped me a ton. Nice summary by Greg.
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Old 10-04-2011, 03:29 AM   #7
Troy Kerr
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Tyson- I could be misunderstanding you and for that I apologize as I am up early. However if you have an issue with hanging out at the top of the 2nd pull aka slow transition to the 3rd, something I found to help myself and my athletes to develop this speed is executing the lifts from the high hang position, as well as taking a look at the jumping mechanics in the 2nd pull.
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