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Old 04-24-2007, 03:01 PM   #1
Steve Shafley
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Default John Jesse's "Wrestling Physical Conditioning Encyclopedia"

Here's the table of contents:



I noticed Mark Twight has been citing this book (for obvious reasons), and I've known that a local college has had this book in it's stacks, and I've been meaning to read it for years.

So, me and the little girl (ha! Eva Claire thought it was so interesting that some big bald guy carries little girl hair clips and barrettes in his pocket) went up and I got a guest library card and I checked it out. Good stuff so far, and really illustrates that there is nothing new under the sun.

Nice read so far.

Misc. quoted text from the book (which I took from the GymJones schedule)

Quote:
Circuit training is a physical conditioning system developed by Morgan and Adamson in England, during the 1950’s, for use with low fitness students (as compared with fit athletes) in school physical education classes. It was designed to simultaneously develop the four aspects of general or athletic fitness: strength, power, muscular and circulo-respiratory endurance.

Circuit training uses three variables (loads, repetitions and time) at sub-maximal levels. It employs the principles of “progressive overload” by: 1) increasing the load, or 2) increasing the repetitions against a constant load, or 3) increasing the speed of performance, or 4) increasing the time a given position or load can be maintained.

Where the original concept of simultaneous development of the four aspects of fitness is desired the emphasis in circuit training is placed on decreasing the time required to perform the exercise or the circuit (doing more work in a given time or the same amount in less time), rather than increasing the resistance load. However, circuit training can be ruined if the athlete or coach pays too much attention to speed and sacrifices the correct performance of the exercise.

Circuit training can be biased towards development of a particular athletic quality. For power, fast explosive movements can be emphasized, exercises of general muscular activity with many repetitions can be used for general endurance and heavy localized exercises against heavy resistance can be used for the development of strength.

The exercises should be arranged so the athlete can proceed from one station to the next without undue muscular fatigue.

Circuit training is individualized training and every effort should be made to adhere to this principle, even in group training. However, some coaches with interest in saving time, use a preset circuit where the load, repetitions and exercises are the same for all members of a team or where only the loads are carried out on an individualized basis.
Quote:
Sandbags, rice bales, sacks loaded with hemp or copra; heavy stones and war clubs were used for the development of strength by wrestlers of many nations for several hundred years, long before the invention of the iron barbell. War clubs and light sandbags weighing 30-80 pounds were used to strengthen the wrists, arm and shoulder muscles and the rotational muscles of the lower back, sides and abdomen. The heavier sandbags, rice bales, stones and sacks of hemp or copra weighing 80 to over 300 pounds were used to develop strength in the lower back, hip and leg muscles. It was common practice to place the sacks on the shoulders and then run or climb hills for muscular and circulo-respiratory endurance ... a true test of total strength would be to carry out the one and two-handed get-up exercises described in Chapter 13 using a heavy sandbag.
Quote:
Circuit Training – originally designed for group participation and best suited for that purpose. If there are fixed stations, encompassing weights, gymnastic equipment, etc., in a gymnasium, club, fieldhouse or on an athletic field, an individual can complete a circuit by himself. Circuits can be designed specifically to either develop isotonic strength (concentric and eccentric), isometric strength, strength or speed dominated power, muscular endurance, strength endurance or circulo-respiratory endurance, but not all of the qualities simultaneously. If designed for strength, strength or speed dominated power, or strength endurance, it is a highly strenuous and extremely fatiguing activity not suited for use by beginners or athletes in poor or fair physical condition. When designed specifically for one individual the principle of progressive overload must be considered, along with the specific requirements of the particular athlete and the activity for which he is training.

It has long been maintained that weight lifting and weight training will develop strength and muscular endurance, but not circulo-respiratory endurance. This was believed because only a few repetitions were completed with heavy weights and the heart rate was not raised to a high level for a sufficiently long period of time to create an effect on the circulo-respiratory system.

Research by Karvonen in 1959 reflected that in any type of weight training activity, the pulse rate was increased by less than 60 percent of the range available by running, no training effect on the heart was observed. From this research, Adamson, the originator of circuit training, found in his experimentation that in the use of weight training with less loads and slightly more repetitions, manipulated isotonically, the pulse rate was raised to the near maximum rate attained by all-out treadmill running. He suggested that it would be possible to arrange weight training programs alone, so as to achieve both strengthening and general endurance (circulo-respiratory) effects.

In 1968 (Pat) O’Shea developed a system that he designated “aerobic” weight training. He commented that it was based on the two principles developed by Cooper relative to aerobic training and the development of circulo-respiratory endurance:
(a) If the exercise develops a heart rate of 150 beats per minute or higher, the development effects begin five minutes after the activity starts and continues as long as the activity is performed
(b) If the activity does not develop a sustained heart rate of 150 beats per minute, the activity must be continued considerably longer than five minutes, such as long distance running, cycling, etc.

O’Shea’s system is based on a circuit interval training approach, with progressive increases in the amount of resistance used in the exercises ... his research reflected that students participating in the program reached a sustained rate of 154 beats per minute for 20 minutes, and the group registered significant improvement in cardio-vascular fitness over an eight-week period.

Several years ago the writer designed a group of weight training routines to develop circulo-respiratory endurance in Olympic weight lifters. The interval training principle was employed, using weights in the 10-30 percent range of maximum with a progressive increase in repetitions (20 to 40) on each exercise for two sets and with varying rest periods of one to three minutes between sets and exercises.

Ten exercises at one station composed a routine. The exercises used were Olympic lift skill movements (press, snatch, clean and jerk) and explosive weight training assistance movements (jumping squats, etc.) interspersed with one stationary running exercise. It took 35 to 45 minutes to complete the entire routine.

Pulse rates during a routine ranged from 122 to 185 during the entire period which is in the pulse range recommended by Gerschler for use with interval training programs for runners. The routines developed physiological aspects of both aerobic and anaerobic endurance.
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Old 04-24-2007, 03:25 PM   #2
Dave Van Skike
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Yo. Recognize; All of this was stolen from Dan John. You will be hearing from the Murray Institute' legal council soon enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
Here's the table of contents:



I noticed Mark Twight has been citing this book (for obvious reasons), and I've known that a local college has had this book in it's stacks, and I've been meaning to read it for years.

So, me and the little girl (ha! Eva Claire thought it was so interesting that some big bald guy carries little girl hair clips and barrettes in his pocket) went up and I got a guest library card and I checked it out. Good stuff so far, and really illustrates that there is nothing new under the sun.

Nice read so far.

Misc. quoted text from the book (which I took from the GymJones schedule)
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Old 04-24-2007, 03:27 PM   #3
Steve Shafley
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I am part of the MILF.

Notice how the two bits about circuit training clash. One says "circuit training is for low fitness individuals" the other say's it's strenuous and fatiguing and NOT for the unfit.
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Old 04-24-2007, 03:42 PM   #4
Dave Van Skike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
I am part of the MILF.

Notice how the two bits about circuit training clash. One says "circuit training is for low fitness individuals" the other say's it's strenuous and fatiguing and NOT for the unfit.

Aha.. this constitutes embezzelment.

Rather fetching snap of Mr. Gable. Looks like an interesting reference.
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Old 04-25-2007, 06:23 AM   #5
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That book looks amazing. Tough to believe it slid into "Out of Print" status and relative obscurity.

One of our clients brought in two football coaches from the SoCal area. One coach is 75, the other is 88 and still coaching, lifting and tough as nails. The 88yrold tore a bicep in a game with one of (I think I have this story right) Fred Hutchinson's brothers. This is interesting in that it was the Hutch that I worked at and is named after...Fred Hutchinson.

Anyway...These guys loved the gym, loved the philosophy of what we do...and they noticed our diagnostic WO's up on the wall. They both said "rounds for time" at about the same moment, looked at each other and laughed. I asked what had struck their fancy and they said that in 1958 a method came out called speed training. Pick an exercise, perhaps two, something like back squats and push press...set a timer and do as many rounds as you can in 20 minutes! Density training...Cindy!

Certainly nothing new under thee sun. it is interesting however...what does one call this? Convergent evolution?
It reminds me of grappling...Eddie Bravo came up with a move called the Lock Down from half guard...he had never seen it in BJJ but found some Judo practitioners who were familiar with it! You barely spend any time on he ground in judo, yet there it is.

Super interesting. Thanks Shaf!
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Old 04-25-2007, 06:34 AM   #6
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There's a lot of interesting stuff in the book. Lots of sandbag stuff, grip training, "buddy" training, etc. Very worthwhile to run in down.

They go over the use of "gymnastics" exercises for wrestlers. Chins, dips, muscle ups, rope climbing, etc.

There are dietary topics which are really dated, i.e. 100 gram of protein a day is all that's needed for a hard training wrestler.

Running programs laid out.

The convergent evolution is pretty interesting. Actually, on reading the book, I thought that there's was no way that GG hadn't read this book already, since so much chimes with XF.

In 1974, the author laments that the wrestlers he coaches are no longer as physically tough or strong as they used to be back in the 40s and 50s, thus much more strength training became necessary.

On that note, I was investigating some local history, since this area had a tremendous logging background, and the men who rode the logs down the rivers to the great lakes apparently possessed great strength, agility, and endurance, and were so feared when they'd go into town, that when the criminal element attempted to rob them, they were almost always shot or had their throats cut in their sleep, due to the difficulties in handling them physically.

Oh yeah, from conditioning to a footnote of logging in the Saginaw Valley.

Completely rambling.
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Old 04-25-2007, 07:44 AM   #7
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Just out of curiousity, I did a quick online search to try to find a used copy. List price $9.95--only one I found available on FetchBook was selling for $100.07, out of the UK.

So, if any of our British friends are interested...
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Old 04-25-2007, 08:04 AM   #8
Steve Shafley
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I wonder if the copyright is up on that? I think James Jesse is deceased, and I don't think the Athletic Press is in business any longer.
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Old 04-25-2007, 08:38 AM   #9
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Looks like an awesome read. I just put in an order thru the interlibrary system.
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Old 04-25-2007, 08:39 AM   #10
R. Alan Hester
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That is a good question, Steve. If the press no longer owns it, you could get permission from his family, or whomever he left the rights, to reproduce it in some way. Otherwise, the copyright is 70 years on printed material such as that. TO get around that, I had planned some weeks back to write a comprehensive review of each chapter and include all pertinent charts. Unfortunately, my thesis adviser has read my the riot act, so all my energies must go toward that for now.

Alan
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